Webinar Review: Your Civil War Ancestors

I’ve been enjoying the free webinars put on
by Legacy Family Tree.  Last week I
watched my third one and was quite pleased. 
Michael Hait’s webinar was, “Your Civil War Ancestors:
Beginning Your Research.” I thought I knew quite about my civil war ancestors,
but Michael’s webinar added some new areas of research for me.  Of course I knew about the indexes of the
Civil War Pension indexes, but I had no idea of the depth of information that
might be available when a pensioner applied. 
Although ordering the information may be expensive, the wealth of
information surpasses what I might have thought possible. 
Certainly Mr. Hait
reminded me of the vast number of photos and drawings available at the Library of Congress Civil War site. Adding photos of related events can and will
make some of the boring bits of story come alive. His talk also reminded me
that Google has a vast number of books that are indexed and searchable.  Many of those books include detailed
descriptions of specific Civil War Regiments. 
My wife’s G-Grandfather fought with Lee’s Army from near the beginning
of the war through to Appomattox and my side fought for both the Union and the
Confederates in Kentucky regiments.
He did mention a site
that I hadn’t thought of for civil war records, the National Park Service Civil War Records.  Certainly
an excellent source for information on various regiments, battles, and letters.
Mr. Hait’s delivery style was a bit uninspiring but his material and his understanding of the material was excellent.  Would I buy the CD? Maybe
not at $12.95 (regular price), but certainly I would love to see it combined in
a package with some other Webinars.  I
highly recommend listening to the webinar before the 5th  of November (while it is still free). The Legacy Family Tree Webinars are well worth following and keeping an eye out for topics that fit your needs.  I’ve even put a couple of their items onto my Yuletide wish list, so, hopefully, I’ll be getting some of them.

Webinar – Privacy & Our Ancestors

I watched the webinar, “Privacy and Our Ancestors” given by Thomas MacEntee on October 3rd.  I really like his delivery style and this talk was spot on. He had a lot to say about expectations regarding privacy over different times.  His webinar is available for free at Legacy Family Tree archives until October 15. If you can’t see it by then, I think this one might be worth purchasing the CD.  Here is the Webinar Description.

Privacy and Our Ancestors. With all the news about privacy, identity theft and the role of access to vital records, have you ever considered that in 2012 most of us (at least here in the United States) have more privacy than our ancestors? As a result of living in the a digital age ruled by the Internet and social media, is there really less privacy than in prior years? In fact, the reverse is true. Learn what type of information about your ancestors was public and how to find it!

Besides his Privacy information, he gives several other hints that I found really good, such as joining the SCGS which I hadn’t thought of doing before his talk.  I probably will do so now though.

Lives and Times – July-Aug 2012

I recently joined the Smyrna Historical and Genealogical Society (SHaGS) and received my first issue of their official publication, Lives and Times. The issue, Vol. 27, No. 4 – July/August 2012 was very informative and interesting.
The cover, and three-page, article is about the dedication of the Taylor/Brawner House and Brawner Hospital – Smyrna’s first National Register of Historic Places. The article has many pictures and “call-outs” of people who attended. There were descendants of the Taylor family (I’m not a relation), lots of elected officials, many SHaGS members and lots other people. I was unable to attend, due to another commitment, but it sure looks like they had a great time. 
The next article regards the SHaGS meeting of June 28, 2012. Professor Tom Scott, of Kennesaw University, talked about the impact of the Bell Bomber Plant coming to Smyrna in the 1940’s. Lockheed took it over in the 1950’s. It fueled the economy of Smyrna and Cobb County for decades.
Next was a New Member section. I forgot that they had taken a photo of me in the museum research room. It is an okay photo. They got some of my history a little incorrect, all of the elements are correct, it is just some of the timings of them are a bit off. Overall, I was very pleased to receive a full column of recognition. There is also a welcome to another new member, Cheryl Emmett Bennett. I really appreciate her membership, as she is who relieves me when my volunteer period is done. Thank you Cheryl both for your membership and for volunteering.
Next are mentions of individuals who have renewed or upgraded their membership in SHaGS.
The next section relates to donations. One was a 1954 postcard with a poem about Smyrna, Georgia. “The finest pace on this old Earth….” It is a lovely little 20-line poem. Also of interest are 18 scrapbooks of the Smyrna American Legion Auxiliary, Post 160. They go back to 1948. I definitely want to look at them during my next museum visit.
Next is a feature article, “From Kennesaw Mountain to the Chattahoochee River: General Johnston’s Lost Opportunity to Save Atlanta.” The five-page article, by William P. Marchione, is quite excellent. Thorough and insightful he discusses Johnston’s flawed strategy, and Francis Shoup’s development of Shoupades, sort of a small mini-fort unique to the Smyrna and Chattahoochee River area. This wonderful article series will be continued in the next issue of Lives and Times.  I’m not much of a civil war enthusiast but his article made me want to learn more. 
Finally, is a long, eleven-page section on “Visiting the Past” which can be an invaluable asset to genealogical researchers. This regular series, researched by Norma McHann, provides notes, obits, occurrences, and interesting historical and genealogical bits throughout Smyrna history taken from various newspapers and other documents at the museum. She stays focused on the two months of the particular issue but go back historically forty, fifty, sixty, seventy, eighty, ninety, 110, 120, 130, and 148 years ago. Some of the items are genealogically important, others are just interesting to read and can put life to a story. For example, [July 6, 1882] “Mr. Hester Haynes, of Atlanta, was buried that Smyrna Saturday afternoon.” to [Aug. 3, 1882] “The Methodists are preparing to build a new church in Smyrna.” The article finishes with a graduation program, and class roll, from the 1952 Senior Class of Campbell High School, which was the school’s first graduating class.
I was very impressed with Lives and Times. It is a great asset for anyone researching individuals from or background information regarding Smyrna, Georgia and a fun read.
For more information regarding SHaGS, please see www.SmyrnaHistory.org.