Family Tree Maker for Mac 3.1

I’m returning to Family Tree Maker for Mac.

Tech Tuesday

In December 2015, I ranted about how unhappy I was that Family Tree Maker was being dropped by Ancestry as a product. I did consider staying with Family Tree Maker 3 for Mac; however, I kept having problems the synchronization of my tree with Ancestry was corrupting my database. So, I decided to search for alternative products.  I wished that Legacy Family Tree had a Mac version and I wanted Roots Magick 7 to have a real Mac product and not a runtime windows version.  Besides the weird file locations (C: and F: drives), I never could get the fonts correct and details displayed in inconsistent ways. I tried several other products, Mac Family Tree, Reunion, and Heredis.  I settled on Heredis and have used it for the past year but I’ve been having problems with it.  When I zoom into some of my sources, the system crashes, sends a crash report to Apple (who is supposed to send it on to Heredis) and then allows me to restart.  It seems that details that I cut and pasted from a website, which has several different fonts and hyperlinks seem to be the culprits. I finally decided to drop Heredis because of this and use something else for my 2017 research. I decided on using Roots Magic 7, exported my two large research files from Heredis to GED format, importing them into Roots Magic, then began working with them.

Then I received the notification that Family Tree Maker has been re-released by MacKiev.  The upgrade from FTM 14 for windows and FTM 3 for Mac was free.  I decided to upgrade and give it a try. I exported my two Roots Magic files to GED format then imported them into FTM.

Wow within a seven-point starWow.  I was immediately reminded of how much I liked Family Tree Maker Mac 3 when I reviewed it in December 2013. I began working on one of my projects, Project Drexl, and saw how nice it was to work with.  Clearly designed for Mac, all the features worked. There were many features that Heredis didn’t have that I was really happy to have back, such as a calendar function. (For example, a calendar of all my ancestors who had birthdays in January.) Also, and probably the biggest thing, was that there are templates for sources that follows Elizabeth Shown Mills’ Evidence Explained.  Linking sources to facts is easy. I liked navigation through family members a bit better with Heredis, but the FTM method is fine.

I haven’t tried to upload and sync my FTM files with Ancestry, yet; and I am not certain that I will do so.  I may just upload what I have with FTM and then break the link. In any event, I’m hoping that Ancestry’s on-line tree isn’t the master of all.

So far, I’m very happy that Family Tree Maker is back and I am looking forward to using it over the next year or so. I think they may have gotten me back.

Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A. Roberts

Amanuensis Monday

Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A. Roberts

Transcription by Don Taylor
2 January 2017


_____OCT 15 1919_____

To the Chief, Finance Division:

You are hereby notified that check #5120565 for $75 00/100

dated Oct 4 1919 in favor of:  PATIENCE A ROBERTS
post-office Whittington  ILL
Certificate #244427  C  W  WID
Class CIVIL WAR R  R  1

Section ____2____ has been returned to this office by the Postmaster
with the information that the pensioner died July 26 or 27-1919
and said check has this day been canceled.

Very respectfully,

(D-3)                                                    GUY O. TAYLOR,
–                                                             DISBURSING CLERK.

Pension - Asa Roberts - Death of Patience A Roberts
Pension – Asa Roberts – Death of Patience A Roberts

Ancestor Biography – Catharine A. D. Walter

Howell-Darling-2017-Research

Waters – Swayze – Darling Line
By Don Taylor

Purported photo of Catherine A. D. (Walker) Swayze. [Not Confirmed]
It seems like virtually every ancestor born before 1880 has a question regarding their birth. Catharine Waters is no exception to that. Most records I have found are consistent with her date of birth being 15 June, 1794, however there are conflicting locations –  Virginia and Maryland.  The only two census records during Catharine’s lifetime indicate her birth occurred in Virginia. However, written genealogies indicate her birth occurred in Maryland, thus my quandary.

Birth Locations for Catharine A. D. Walter

Document/Source Date of Document Birthdate Suggested
1850 Census[i] 1850 1794-1795 – Virginia
1860 Census[ii] 1860 1794-1795 – Virginia
Marker (per Find a Grave) 1868 24 or 25 June 1789
Obituary – Kalamazoo Telegraph 18 Apr 1866 1868 May or June 1794
Genealogy of the Swasey Family[iii] 1910 15 Jun 1794 – Maryland
DAR Descendant’s List – Helen J. Roy -Nat’l #455124, Ancestor #A120153[iv] Unknown 15 Jun 1794 – Maryland
Sweezey.Com[v] 2011 15 June 1794 – Maryland

On page 187 of the Genealogy of the Swasey Family, Benjamin Franklin Swasey writes, “Catharine A. D. Walter, b. in Maryland, June 15, 1794. Of course, he provides no source for this assertion.

Bob Sweezey, via sweezey.com, states Catharine’s birthplace is Maryland even though he notes that the 1860 Census indicates Virginia. However, I don’t see where his provided a source for his assertion either.

Finally, the DAR descendants list of member Helen J. Roy (Nat’l #: 455124 – Ancestor #: A120153) fails to indicate the source of her assertion that, “Catharine Walter born on 15 – Jun – 1794 at MD.”

The death records really confuse things.  Catharine’s obituary in the Kalamazoo Telegraph and the registry entry with the Michigan Department of Community Health suggests a birth year of 1794 (age 73 years, 10 months) but some think her marker indicates 78 years, 9 months, 22 days.  The photo evidence on Find a Grave isn’t clear and compelling. I can see it indicating 73 years or 78 years.  The image just isn’t clear enough for me.  I think some enhanced photographic techniques may be needed to clear up the conflict.

52 Ancestors – Howell-Darling Ancestor #51

Catharine Ann Dent Walter (1794-1868)

Catharine (known as Katherine[vi] in some records) Waters was born on 15 June 1794 in Virginia (See above) to James and Margaret Ann (Swan) Walker. She is the only child of theirs that I know of.

She married David Swayze on 17 January 1817.

In 1818, Catharine had Elizabeth Jane Swayze, the first of her 8 children.

In 1820, the young Swayzee family was living in Richland, Fairfield County, Ohio.

During the following decade, Catharine had five more children, Emily Ann, Margeretta, Angeline, William D. and S. B. Swayze. Margeretta Swayze died in 1823 at the age of two.

The 1830 Census found the family in Walnut, Fairfield County, Ohio. During the 1830s, Catharine had two more children, Theodore P and Caroline M Swayze in 1837 and 1838 respectively.

About 1840, the Swayzee’s moved to Kalamazoo and they were there for the 1850 and 1860 censuses.  When Catharine died in 1868, her obituary mentions that they had been living in the area for 28 years, which fits their arrival date in Kalamazoo as about 1840.

On 25 September, 1850, Catharine’s husband David Swayze died. On 24 July 1857, Catharine’s daughter, Elizabeth Jane (Swayze) Darling’s husband Rufus Holton Darling died. By the 1860 Census Catharine was living with her daughter Elizabeth and Elizabeth’s remaining children.

Marker – Catherine A. D. Swayze

Death

Catharine died 16 Apr 1868 in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo, Michigan.[vii]

Burial

Some researchers indicate that she was buried at Marion, Ohio, however, she has a marker at Mountain Home Cemetery in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, Michigan. Her marker indicates that she died aged 78 years, 9 months and 22 Days. However, her obituary indicates that she was 73 years, 10 months at the time of her death which coincides with her birth date.

Further Actions – Follow-up

  • Await response from Bob Sweezey who I emailed through his website to see if he can shed any light regarding his sources for this information.
  • Finally, I can order a set of 10 DAR documents which support Helen Roy’s DAR Application through the DAR for $20.
  • Visit Mountain Home cemetery in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Use enhanced photographic techniques on Catharine A. D. Swayzee’s marker at Mountain View Cemetery, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

List of Grandparents

  • GrandParent:   Robert Harry Darling
  • 1stGreat:           Rufus Harry Darling
  • 2ndGreat:          Elizabeth Jane Swayzee
  • 3rdGreat:         Catharine Ann Dent Walter
  • 4thGreat:          James Walter

————-DISCLAIMER————-

ENDNOTES


 

“Chin Chin” at Maryland Theatre, Cumberland, MD, 20 April 1920

We know that Chin Chin played in Coshocton, Ohio, on April 11th. However, we don’t know yet where else the company played between there and Cumberland.

Stage of the Maryland Theater, Cumberland, MD
Stage of the Maryland Theater, Cumberland, MD via Kidstuff.com

What we do know is from the April 14, 1920, edition of the Cumberland Evening Times – Page 10 – Column 1.

Maryland Theatre

 “Chin Chin” Coming to the Maryland Theatre, Tuesday, April 20

The Production of Charles Dillingham’s “Chin Chin” has rivaled even “Floradora” in its popularity. Walter Wills and Roy Binder are featured members of the organization. They are slim young men, masters of the eccentric dance and comedians of more than ordinary ability.

“Chin Chin is a musical comedy, or extravaganza, or fantasy, whatever it may please one to call it; but it is saturated with the comic spirit and abounds in delightful pantomime.

The notices accorded the company this year prove that the aggregation of players is exceptional and that the production as a whole is a real “Top Notch” Dillingham show, and that even in war times “Chin Chin” has been doing a record business on the road, near army camps and elsewhere.

The book of the play is by Anne Caldwell and R. H. Bernside, Lyrics by Miss Caldwell and James O’Dea, and music by Ivan Caryll, remembered for the melodies of “The Pink Lady” and “The Little Cafe.”

Of its songs, “Violets,” “The Gray Moon,” “Love Moon,” “Good Bye” and “Go Gar Sig Gong Jute” are not likely to be forgotten for some seasons to come. There is also saxaphone music by the renowned Tom Brown’s Clown Sextette. In fact, “Chin Chin” is one of those fortunate shows that is clean and wholesome fun, offending no one.


Maryland Theatre

Drawing - Maryland Theatre, Cumberland, MD c. 1907
Drawing – Maryland Theatre, Cumberland, MD c. 1907

The Maryland Theater was built for about $70,000 based upon plans by John D. Allen, Philadelphia, PA. It opened on 21 November, 1907 with a seating capacity of nearly 1800. It closed on 9 October, 1963 and was demolished in December, 1966.[i]

The 1920 Census indicates that Cumberland was a city of nearly 30,000 people.  The Julius Cahn Theatrical Guide for 1913-1914 indicates that the theatre had a capacity of 1,696, 600 on the main floor, 340 in the balcony, 600 in the gallery, and 56 box seats. The Stage was a large 38×33 feet and the front to back wall was 41 feet.  There were four stage pockets.  For newspapers, besides the “Times,” whose afternoon circulation was 7,179, there was the “News” with a morning circulation of 4,000.[ii]

 

Further Research

Obtain a subscription to Newspaper Archives and look for additional information about “Chin Chin” playing in the Cumberland Times.

Find a source for the Cumberland News and see if they have any articles regarding the show.


 Endnotes

[i] Internet: Cinema Treasurers – Maryland Theater in Cumberland, MD – http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/28957

[ii] The Julius Cahn – Gus Hill – Theatrical Guide 1913-1914: Page 290 – Cumberland, MD, via Google Books

————-Disclaimer————-

My Best of 2016 & Expectations for 2017

Happy New Year - 2017

Happy New Year – 2017

My Best of 2016

I changed my blogging platform during 2016. Switching from Blogger to WordPress was a challenge and switching from blog.dtaylorgenealogy.com to www.dontaylorgenealogy.com was even worse.  My former domain, dtaylorgenealogy.com was supposed to redirect to the new domain, but it never worked reliably.  I don’t know why. Eventually, I just let the old domain lapse. Anyway, because of the changes, statistics are not available in one place but rather are spread between the two like apple butter and orange marmalade. Both are good on toast but don’t go together at all.

WordPress

As I mentioned, in September I switched to WordPress from Blogger. It has taken much longer to rebuild my direct following then I expected. I still have more “followers” via Blogger than I do via WordPress. As I am no longer posting to the Blogger site, anyone subscribing to via Blogger should subscribe using WordPress using the widget Right Column – Top instead. Actually, if you want to follow my genealogy blog, that is the best place to do so.  Facebook, Google Plus, and Twitter are nearly as reliable to follow with.

Looking at the site statistics on the WordPress site, interestingly, the number one posting in views is a 2013 article regarding the McAllister Murder – Murder Suspect and Wife – Jan 20th. [Darling Research]

My number 1 article from 2016 is an April article posted on the Blogger site and moved to the WordPress site regarding the MGS Spring Workshop. [Reviews]

Finally, the number one posting since I made the switch to WordPress is about the Birth Record of Patience A. Roberts. [Roberts Research]

Google Search is, by far, the most common referrer to my site. FaceBook is a distant second.

Blogger

The review of Family Tree Maker Mac 3 that I did in 2013 is still, by far, my most read posting on Blogger. [Reviews]

My most viewed family history posting on Blogger was an article about my William Price (1782-1846). [Howell Research]

Finally, my most read Blogger post, and my most read posting of 2016 was Compulsive Searching – Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949).  That is an article about my excitement regarding researching my grandfather, show name I only determined a few weeks before.[Roberts Research]

Again, Google was the most common referrer to my site, and Facebook a second. Ow.ly was the third most common referrer. I post links to my site to Facebook, Google Plus, and Twitter using HootSuite which uses ow.ly as the URL to shorten the link.

I think the most interesting posting I have done during the past year are was Compulsive Searching – Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949). [Roberts Research]

2017 – The Future

Certainly, my five major research lines will take the majority of my effort.  These are my ancestors on the Brown and Roberts lines and my wife ancestral lines of Darling and Howell.  Also, the vaudeville career of my grandmother, Donna Montran, will be a major thread in my activities.  I’ll probably drop activity regarding the “Great War” as a major category and move it under “Other.”

My volunteer work at the Scarborough Historical Society has been growing.  I’ve developed a website for them and expect that I’ll post quite a lot there. Check it out at scarboroughhistoricalsociety.org.  I suspect that much of my work that I post there I will cross post here. So, look for SHS as a new major topic on my Blog.

I am also involved with the Maine Genealogical Society and the Greater Portland Chapter of the Maine Genealogical Society. I anticipate that I will be posting content regarding them, their activities, and my participation in those activities.

I have several projects that I am working on. I expect to continue working on many of them and posting about them.  I may break active projects out of “Other” into its own category.

DNA – Genetic Genealogy is a really important part of my research. It has provided clues to determining my biological father. It has also provided the starting point for connections to cousins I might otherwise have never gotten to know. I also have a significant project to learn the biological father of my half-sister Glennis.  I think I am zeroing in on potential candidates. This is a very exciting project for both Glennis and me.

Finally, I still have my food and travel blog, D. Taylor’s Food and Travel. I don’t spend a lot of energy on it, but you might find it interesting.

My blogs are:

Blogs I maintain for others:


Please let me know what you would like me to focus upon on my blog posting activities.  Are there specific areas you would like me to focus upon?  If so, please let me know.  Are there any of my posts that you found to be particularly interesting? Please use the comments form below. If you do not want your comments made public, please add “Please do not publish” to the first line of text in your message.

————-Disclaimer————-