Ancestor #34 – Thomas A Pankey (c. 1760-1829)

 Howell-Darling-2016 Research
Howell/Pankey Line

By Don Taylor

Burning of Washington DC in 1814.
Burning of Washington DC in 1814.

Sadly, the 1790 Census and the 1800 Census records for Virginia were lost. Apparently destroyed by the British during the war of 1812. This loss has a major effect on tracing this family line during the time before 1810. Additionally, many genealogies regarding Thomas are sparse or contain conflicting information.  For example, one researcher indicates that his step-mother is Betsey Kinsey Pankey and that his sister was Betsey Kinsey Pankey.  These other sources also indicate a lot of conflicting information.  As such, this generation is difficult to trace and understand the family relationships. As such, additional research is needed.

 List of Grandparents

  • Grand Parent: James Dallas Howell (1879-1964)
  • 1st Great: Peter Fletcher Howell (1842-1924)
  • 2nd Great: Carolina M. A. Pankey (c. 1811-?)
  • 3rd Great: Thomas A. Pankey (c. 1760-1829)
  • 4th Great: Samuel Pankey (1738-1807)

 

Thomas A. Pankey

Thomas A. Pankey was probably born between 1755 and 1765. The 1810 Census shows him as the head of household and over 45 years of age, clearly indicating that he was born before 1765.  Several other researchers have stated that he was born after 1755; however, I have been unsuccessful in finding a source for that assertion.

Other researchers report that Thomas had several siblings, Philip, John and Samuel Hardin Pankey may be his brothers and Lelah may be a sister and possibly Betsy Kinsey Pankey, although other research indicates that Betty Kinsey Binford was his mother.  Having a daughter with the same first and middle name as the mother is unusual but not unheard of. I need to do further research into the siblings of Thomas.

Thomas Pankey married Martha Cannon in November 1785 in Goochland County, Virginia. One source, Elizabeth Petty Bentley, indexer of Virginia Marriage Records 1700-1850, [via Ancestry.Com] indicates their marriage was 25 November 1875. Meanwhile, James Dodd, in Virginia, Compiled Marriages, 1660-1800 states that Thomas Pankey married Martha Cannon on 1 Nov 1785 in Goochland County, Virginia. Further research is needed to eliminate the conflict. Some records suggest that Martha Cannon and Martha Leggon are the same person. If so, then it appears that Thomas and Martha had at least seven children:

  1. Mary Y                                    Born c. 1792, Married Ellis Armistead
  2. Nancy Branch                       Born c. 1794, d. c1865
  3. Thomas Armstrong             Born c. 1799, d. 1875
  4. Elizabeth                               Born c. 1805, m. Samuel Scott (c. 1830),
  5. Francis                                   Born c. 1807, D. 1870
  6. Caroline M. A.                      Born c. 1811, d. after 1860.
  7. Henrietta                               Married before 1830.

Census Records

  • 1790 Census – Missing.
  • 1800 Census – Missing.
  • 1810 Census – Cumberland County, Virginia.
  • 1820 Census – Cumberland County, Virginia.

In 1826, Cumberland County Virginia had $350 of debt transferred to the estate of John P. Price.

Thomas A. Pankey died in June of 1829.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Further research the siblings of Thomas A. Pankey.
  • Clear up the conflict of marriage date (1 Nov or 25 Nov 1785).
  • Further research the children of Thomas A. Pankey.

Sources:

  • Com: 1810 Census – Thomas Pankey – Cumberland County, Virginia
  • Com: 1820 Census – 1820 Census – Thomas Pankey – Cumberland County, Virginia
  • Library of Virginia: CUMBERLAND CO VA Chancery Causes, 1764-1912
  • Jackson, Michael Edmund: via Geni.com: Geni People – Thomas Pankey – https://www.geni.com/people/Thomas-Pankey/6000000011659954307
  • Howell, Peter M.: The Life and Travels of Peter Howell: In Which will be seen some Marvelous Instances of the Gracious Providence of God. Newbern, N.C.:  H. Mayhew, 1849. http://archive.org/details/lifetravelsofpet00howe
  • Ancestry.com: Virginia, Compiled Marriages, 1660-1800 (compiled by Jordan Dodd); Thomas Pankey & Martha Cannon.
  • Ancestry.com: Virginia, Marriage Records, 1700-1850; Page 202 – Thomas Pankey & Martha Cannon

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Deed Transfer – Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan

Amanuensis Monday – Howell Research – 3 April 1794

Transcription & Interpretation by Don Taylor

[Source: Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Pages 248 and 249.]

Image of Deed Record of property transfer Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan (1)
Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Page 249.

This Indenture made this the 3rd day of April in the year of our lord

Christ One Thousand Seven Hundred Ninety Four between Robert

Bryan of Martin county and Province of North Carolina of the one

part and Lewis Bryan of the County and province aforesaid of the other

part ??? ??? that the said Robert Bryan for and in Consideration

of the sum of one hundred pounds give to him in land  ???  ??? to

[page change]

Image of Deed Record of property transfer Robert Bryan to Lewis Bryan (2)
Martin County Old Deed Records. Book C, Page 249.

in him off?? do our knowledge therein of these with fully satisfied and paid and ??

in faith granted buy and sold and by these presents doth grant bargain

see unto the said Lewis Bryan his heirs and assigns forever a tract of land

Containing one hundred ninety acres lying and being in the county of Martin

On the south side of Conoho Creek Beginning at a point in Hampton ?? ???

Tence No 59 N E 180 Pole asine Thence no 35 W S45 pole to asire on the ???

Thence along the ?? Creek to 59 E b 180 pole to an path thence to 35 EB 145 pole

Bryan ?? by deed of sale proved and registered in the registrar’s office of

??? county together with all houses buildings & privileges ??? residences

to the same belonging or in anywise appertaining unto the said Lewis Bryan

his heirs and assigns forever. In witness ?? of I Robert Bryan hise???

In the presence of ??? Witness.

John Hyman Durat

Catron Bryan (Her Mark) [Plain “X”]

Robert R Bryan (His Mark)


Facts:

Residences: Robert Bryan and Lewis Bryan were alive on 3 Apr 1894 and both lived in Martin County, North Carolina

Event: Property Sale – Robert Bryan sold 190 acres in Martin County for 100 pounds to Lewis Brian. I am unable to decipher the physical location of the property other than it appears to be adjoining Conoho Creek.

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Discover

 

Will DNA Testing provide the Answer for my Howell Brick Wall?

By Don Taylor

I have completed my initial writing about Generations 3, 4, and 5 on my Howell line research. (See my blog on Howell Research for a list of people and articles.) My next person to research in that line is the unknown father of Peter M. Howell, my wife’s third great grandfather. When you begin researching an unknown person, it is highly desirable to have a plan.  Maybe not as formal of a plan as many genealogists do, or say we should do, but it needs to be enough to get going and not duplicate previous efforts. The plan is simple.

  • Consolidate what I know.
  • Determine a pathway to potentially learn more.
  • Document and relate what I find.
  • Determine the vital information about the subject.

What I know:

What little I do know about Peter’s father was gleaned from Peter’s book, The Life and Travels of Peter Howell by Peter M. Howell[i]. From it, we know that Peter was born 15 July 1805, so there is a presumption that Peter’s father lived in Charlotte County, Virginia, in 1805. We know that the family moved to Buckingham County, Virginia in 1807. We also know that Peter’s father died when Peter was 12 years old (c. 1817). Finally, just for ballpark purposes, I conjecture that Peter’s father was likely somewhere between 20 and 45 when Peter was born. That gives the following:

Unknown father of Peter M. Howell

  • Born c. 1760-1785.
  • Resided Charlotte County, VA. 1805.
  • Resided Buckingham County, VA 1807.
  • Died Buckingham County, VA 1817-18.

Because this is my wife’s father’s father’s father’s father’s father, it is a perfect situation for Y-DNA testing one of my wife’s brothers. The first brother I asked agreed to test; he tested through Family Tree DNA – Amazing results. There were three matches with a genetic distance of 0 (Zero). The surprise was that the surname wasn’t Howell, rather it is Howle. Nothing I had ever seen before ever suggested that spelling for the surname.  Also, the haplogroup was I-M253 rather than the typical R-xxxx most Howells are.

A genetic distance of zero means there are no differences between the 37 markers tested. According to Family Tree DNA, that indicates an 83.49% likelihood that they share a common ancestor in 4 generations, a 93.29% likelihood in 6 generations, and a 97.28% likelihood in 8 generations. I have four generations (to Peter M. Howell) with assurance.

All three of the Howles indicate their most distant ancestor is William Howle, born circa 1730. One mentions William as being born in Lunenburg Co., VA and two show he was born in Charlotte County, VA. A quick check of Wikipedia indicated that Charlotte County was formed from Lunenburg County in 1764, so, all are consistent. (I love consistency.)

One of the three has a GEDCOM file on Family Tree DNA showing his 4th and 5th great grandfathers born in Charlotte County, VA. Another interesting item of his GEDCOM is that his Howle family moved from Virginia to South Carolina and then to Alabama. Peter M. Howell’s half-sister married a Holman and moved to Alabama. Peter apprenticed with him for a while in Alabama. So, there might be a connection there as well.

Crumbling Brick Wall
Crumbling Brick Wall

I also joined The Howell Surname Y-DNA project on Family Tree DNA. There are seven other people with the same Y-DNA Haplogroup (I-M253). Two of them indicate ancestors in North Carolina and two indicate ancestors in Virginia (three don’t provide a location for their earliest ancestor.)

I am excited. Family Tree DNA testing results may well provide the clues to help me find the answers to my Howell line brick wall. The DNA testing results are providing new holes in the wall for me to peek through and see if I can find the answers to the Howell research wall.

Further Actions:

Contact Match #2 and see if he has a tree that might include potential candidates for Peter M. Howells father.
Contact Match #3 and see if he has a tree that might include potential candidates for Peter M. Howells father.
Contact Haplogroup I-M253 matches with Howell surnames for further details.
Do further research regarding the descendants of William Howle, born circa 1730 because he may have had additional offspring that weren’t identified by other researchers.

List of Greats

Peter Fletcher Howell
Peter M. Howell
Unknown (father of Peter M.) Howell

Contact

If you are related to Peter M. Howell, or anyone in this Howell like I would love to hear from you.  Please use the contact form below.

ENDNOTES

[i] Howell, Peter. 1849. The life and travels of Peter Howell, written by himself in which will be seen some marvelous instances of the gracious providence of God. Newbern, N.C.: W.H. Mayhew.

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Inconsistencies with Samuel Aquilla Long (1817-c.1870)

By – Don Taylor

Sometimes, I feel like I am marching to the beat of a different drummer.  Or as my mother might say, “Look at my son, he is in step, but everyone else is out of step.” Once again, that is the case in my research of Samuel Aquilla Long. The problem is that there are a couple things that just don’t make sense to me, so I need to make a different determination of what I believe are the facts.
The first conflict of facts is easy. Various sources, including the DAR Descendants Database indicate that Samuel Aquilla Long died on 3 April 1866.[1]  However, he is clearly in the 1870 Census, alive and well.

Certainly, the census taker writes the names of Sam’s wife and daughter [Martha] in a way that indexers have had trouble reading, and I can’t fault them. But, the names and ages of the children all match up correctly.  Consequently, I have little doubt that Samuel Aquilla Long died sometime after 1 June 1870, and probably sometime after 30 July 1870 when the enumerator visited the area.
The Martin County Heritage, an awesome book, has an article about Samuel Aquilla Long, written by Sarah Long Johnson. Sarah was the great-granddaughter of Samuel Aquilla Long. In her article,[2] almost in passing, she mentions that Samuel (son of John Long) m. Martha Ann Bryan. Over the years, I have been struggling to find some corroborating evidence to support Samuel’s father’s name without success.    The public trees I’ve found don’t provide a source for Samuel’s father’s name or go back to Sarah Long Johnson’s article in Martin County Heritage.

The second issue is a bit more complicated.

The problem occurred when I attempted to follow Samuel back to the 1840 Census.
The 1870 Census indicated Samuel was 50.
The 1860 Census indicated Samuel was 40.
The 1850 Census indicated Samuel was 33. (Humm.)
Every record I’ve found indicates that Samuel was born in Martin County. He married in Martin County in 1844.  Consequently, I believe that Samuel had to be in Martin County in 1840.
A search of the 1840 Census looking for Samuel had no results. Because the 1840 Census only indicates the names of Heads of Households, I didn’t expect Samuel to be listed; I figured the 20-23-year-old was probably living with his parents. So then I searched for John.  Nothing.
I figured something must be amiss and searched for surname Long in Martin County in 1840 Census. There were four heads of households in Martin County. Joshua, Stephen, W.B., and Gracey Long.  “W.B. was the only person in his household, so that couldn’t be Samuel. The only other person with a 20-30-year-old male in the household was Stephen Long.
A review of the 1830 Census yielded similar results. In that Census, there were two children ages 10 to 15 in the household where Stephen Long was the head of household.
Sadly, the 1820 Census records for Martin County were lost.[3]
Many scenarios can explain my findings.

Sarah was incorrect about Samuel’s father’s name being John, and it is Stephen instead.
Samuel’s father was named John Stephen or Stephen John making both names for the same person.
Samuel’s father John had died before 1830 and Samuel lived with Stephen Long in 1830 & 1840.
Samuel wasn’t born and raised in Martin County.

Biography

Usually, I would write a biography about Samuel Aquilla Long at this point.  However, because of the above issue and problems and some other inconsistencies in my records, I’ve decided that things are too messed up for me to make sense of the Long family of Martin County, North Carolina. 

Further Actions:

Contact the Martin County Historical Society and see if they have anyone researching Samuel Aquilla Long’s ancestors. [Email sent 5/9/2016.] 
Perform a Surname/Location study for all Longs in Martin County before 1880. There were only 34 individuals with the surname of Long and only nine people with the surname identified as “Head of Household” in Martin County in 1880. So, a Surname/Study should be relatively easy in this case. I should also particularly look for siblings of Samuel Aquilla Long and look for offspring of Stephen Long. 
Determine the relationship of the children, John & James in relation to Martha Ann as they were born before her marriage to Samuel. 


List of Greats

1.     Deborah Ann Long
2.    Samuel Aquilla Long
3.     John Long (or Stephen Long)
ENDNOTES

[1] DAR Descendants Database, National Number #517846 http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search/?Tab_ID=3
[2] Hughes, Shelby Jean Nelson. 1980. Martin County heritage. Williamston, N.C.: Martin County Historical Society. “The Samuel Long Family” Article #579.
[3] Family Search Wiki: North Carolina Censuses Existing and Lost; 1820 Census;  Currituck, Franklin, Martin, Montgomery, Randolph, and Wake counties missing. https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/North_Carolina_Censuses_Existing_and_Lost

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It is all the rage – Birthplace Charts

It has become all the rage. Doing a birthplace chart.  I understand that J. Paul Hawthorne started the idea on Facebook of doing a simple pedigree chart indicating where your ancestors came from.  It has been picked up by many others, including Judy Russell, in her blog, The Legal Genealogist.  It was also suggested in Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings  blog, so I just had to jump on the bandwagon and give it a try.
Don’s Birthplace Chart

There are several templates available, both Judy and Randy suggested one at on Google Drives.  I used it and filled in my entries with my own colors. 

My Birthplace Chart

It is clear, Michigan (light blue), with seven ancestors, is the most common state where my ancestors were born.  Next most common was Illinois (brown), with five ancestors born there.
There is a little bit of the Western Movement showing up in my chart.  New York to Indiana, Ohio to Indiana, but more so, I think, a northern movement shows up with Tennessee to Illinois to Michigan and Kentucky and Michigan to North Dakota. The unknown birth location for my maternal, great-grandfather’s parents jumps out like a sore thumb.  Trying to figure out those ancestors names and birth places is high on my list of tasks for my Brown/Montran research.
Rather than just saying England, I added the flag to show the birthplace of my 2nd great grandmother, my only known immigrant ancestor in four generations. 
My wife’s Birthplace Chart

Then I got to thinking, I really couldn’t do one of these charts without doing one for my wife’s family. We went to Easter dinner yesterday at one of niece’s homes. We enjoyed conversation with several family members. Needles-to-say, at some point anytime there is a family get together somehow the conversation turns to genealogy.  Anyway, I just happened to bring a hard copy of my wife’s birthplace chart.  It would be identical for her brother, except for the place of birth. Her brother, “J,” loved the chart and took it with him. 

I have really enjoyed the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun activity. Thanks for sharing the idea. Both my wife’s and my Birthplace charts are interesting to look at; they provide a visual representation of family lines and allows me to see things and notice things I might not otherwise notice.  Thank you J. Paul Hawthorn for the idea and thanks to Judy Russell and Randy Seaver for promoting it to be “all the rage.”

–       Don Taylor

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