Happy Saint Patrick’s Day

My Irish Ancestry

Brown/Sanford/Parsons/Maben
Roberts/Scott

My Ancestry – 18% Irish, 82% “Great Britain”

I grew up being told I was English, Irish, and French. And modern DNA testing results have confirmed that.  Ancestry indicates that I am 18 percent Irish and the rest “Great Britain” which included England, France, Belgium, The Netherlands, Luxembourg, and part of Germany.

I have discovered very few immigrant ancestors among my Ancestors. Only two that I know of were born in Ireland.  The first one is a sixth great-grandfather on my Brown line.

John Maben (1753-1813) was born in County Antrim, Northern Ireland in 1753[i]. He came to America and fought in the American Revolution. He served with Capt. Abner Hawley and Col. Peter Van Ness in the 9th Regt., Albany County Militia[ii]. In 1781, he married Sally Pierce in Connecticut. He died in Lexington, Greene County, New York in 1813.

Interestingly enough Slemish, in County Antrim, is the location that Saint Patrick was a slave for seven years.

Descendants of John Maben include:

My second Irish ancestor is a seventh great-grandfather on my Roberts line.

James Scott (1719-1783) was born in Northern Ireland in 1719. His wife’s name was Ester and he died in Virginia in 1783. I have not researched him in depth, consequently, I know little else about him.

Descendants of James Scott include:

  •             William Jarvis Scott (____-____)
  •             John Scott (1784-1855)
  •             Samuel Kinkade Scott (1809-____)
  •             William Hunt Scott (1834-1903)
  •             Samuel Vaden Scott (1863-1931)
  •             Clora Dell Scott (1883-1945)
  •             Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949)
  •             Hugh Eugene Roberts (1926-1997)
  •             Me

Today, Saint Patrick’s Day, 2019, I raise a glass and toast my Irish ancestry.


ENDNOTES

[i] It is possible that John Maben was born in the town of Antrim in County Antrim.
[ii] Daughters of the American Revolution, “Ancestor Search”, DAR, Maben, John – Patriot: A072838.

1900 Census – Searching for misspelled Salefske’s

Census Sunday
Roberts-Dion-Spry-Salefske Project
By Don Taylor

My half-brother’s (Tom) maternal line has been difficult to trace, mostly due to unusual names. His great-grandmother’s name is probably Ottilie Salefske. But in various records, I’ve seen her named Ottlie, Tillie, Lillie, Tily, and even Matilda. Likewise, her surname is spelled a half a dozen ways also, It seems like I need to search using lots of question marks, “S?l??sk?”. As such, neither he nor I were successful in finding Ottilie in the 1900 Census. So, I gave it a try leaving the surname off completely. I searched for her father, “Charles” and his wife “Hattie” with a child “Albert.” Albert is believed to be Ottilie’s next younger brother. They are all names that are common enough to typically be spelled correctly in the Census record and to be interpreted by indexers correctly. It didn’t matter if I searched using Ancestry.Com or Family Search, the correct family was found immediately with a completely different, but understandable, spelling – “Lelensky.” So, if you can’t find someone in a census that you should, be sure to try searching without the surname and enter just the relationships of several first names.

Document Image

Image of the 1900 Census showing Charles Salefsky & family of Detroit, Wayne, MI
1900 Census – Charles Salefsky – Detroit, Wayne, MI.

My Transcription

1900 Census – Michigan, Wayne, Detroit, Ward 14
Enumeration District 156, Sheet 18
Lines 6 through 14 – 246 Lovett

  • Lelensky [Salefske] Charles – Head – May 1855 | 45 – Married 10 years – Born Germany, PR Immigration 1888 in the US for 11 years – Machinist – Owns House.
  •     –    Hattie  – Wife  –  June 1857 | 42  Married 10 years, 3 children born, 3 living  – Born Germany, PR – Immigration 1879, in US 20 years.
  •     –    Otto  –  Son     – July 1880 – Age 19            – Born Germany, Pr – Immigration 1888, in US 11 years. – Brass Finisher
  •     –    Odilia  –  Daughter – Dec 1883 – Age 16     – Born Germany, Pr – Immigration 1888, in US 11 years.
  •     –    Albert  –  Son  – Mar 1886 – Age 14             – Born Germany, Pr – Helper Machinist  – Immigration 1888, in US 11 years.
  • Sauli [Sante?], Anna – S. Daughter  Jan 1887 Age 13 – Michigan At School
  •     –    Walter   –  S. Son   Mar 1888 – Age 11 – Michigan       At School
  •     –    Hugo   –  S. Son – Nov 1891 – Age 2    – Michigan
  • Salensky, Louise – Mother  – Jan 1818 – Age 82, Wd 4 children, 4 living – Germany, Pr. Immigration 1893, 6 yrs in the US

All parents were born in “Germany, Pr.”

Discussion

The great thing about this census record is that it clearly shows that Hattie was in the United States before Otto, Ottilie, and Albert came to the United States.

Also, it shows that Anna, Walter, and Hugo are all stepchildren to Charles.

One obvious mistake is that Hugo, who was born Nov 1891 is identified as only 2-years-old instead of 8 years old.  It does make some dates a little confusing; if Charles and Hattie had been married for 10 years, how did Hugo, age 8, become identified as a step-son? Even if Hattie were pregnant with Hugo when she and Charles married, it would seem incorrect. I need to search further to find Charles and Hattie’s marriage record.

William Hunt Scott (1834-1903)

Ancestor Sketch
Roberts-Scott Line
By Don Taylor

Roberts Research 2019 – Ancestor #36

List of Grandparents

  1. – Grandfather: Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949)
  2. – 1st Great-grandmother: Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams (1883-1945)
  3. – 2nd Great-grandfather: Samuel Vaden Scott(1862-1931) & More
  4. – 3rd Great-grandfather: William Hunter Scott (c. 1834-1903)
  5. – 4th Great-grandfather: Samuel Kinkade Scott (1809-?)[1]
  6. – 5th Great-Grandfather: John Scott (1784-1856)
  7. – 6th Great-Grandfather: William Jarvis Scott (? – ?)
  8. – 7th Great-Grandfather: James Scott (1719-1783)

William Hunt Scott (c.1834-1903)

Birth

William Hunt Scott was born in Turkey Hill, St. Clair County Illinois about 1834. His father, John Scott, came to Illinois with his father in s1797 and along with five brothers and one brother-in-law established the “Turkey Hill” colony in present-day St. Clair County. This was the first American settlement in the county.

In other news of the times, The Black Hawk War had ended only two years before his birth. John Reynolds resigned as Governor of Illinois to become a Representative to the US Congress. William Lee Ewing took his place as governor for about three weeks until newly elected Joseph Duncan became the sixth governor of Illinois, and the first, and only, Whig to that office.

Childhood

William grew up as the oldest of six children.  His five siblings included:

Name Born
Sarah 1836
Mary 1839
Francis/Franklin 1840
Emily 1845
Rachel 1849

All were born in St. Clair County.

The 1840 Census indicates the Samuel Scott family of St Clair, Illinois consists of himself, apparently his wife and three children including William. The other two are presumed to be Sarah and Mary.

The 1850 Census indicates the Samuel K Scott family of Turkey Hill, St. Clair, Illinois consists of Samuel, apparently his wife and six children. The 16-year-old William is farming, and four of his younger siblings (Sarah, Mary, Francis, and Emily) are attending school.

Marriage to Emily Hendricks.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860 (probably between 1850 and 1856), William located to Washington County, Illinois.

There, in 1856, when he was about 22 years old, William married Emily Maples Hendricks.

They had four children together.

Name Born Location
Viola 1860 Washington Co.
Samuel Vaden 1863 Washington Co.
Francis Perry 1870 St. Clair Co.
William Alonzo 1871 St. Clair Co.

Adult

The 1860 Census indicates they lived in Township 3S, Range 4W. Today that township is now known as Elkton Township. The towns of Elkton and Oakdale (Ayers Point Post Office) lie within it. Both are about 5 miles southwest of Nashville, Illinois. The family consisted of William, Emily, and their oldest child, Viola. William was a farmer.

I have not found evidence, yet, regarding William and the Civil War. I would expect a 27-year-old of the time to have served. There are hundreds of “William Scott’s” who served in Illinois and determining if this William Scott served is a future project for me.

The 1870 Census showed the family back in St. Clair County and enumerated in Freeburg. The family consists of William, Emily, and three of the children, Viola, Sam, and 3-month-old Francis. William is working as a “Wagon Maker.” Viola and Sam are attending school.

On 27 October 1878 Emily died.  What happened to William after that is mostly unknown. Samuel married Amanda Jane Haley in May 1879. Viola married Charles Monroe Kansas Galloway two months later, in July 1879. I have been unsuccessful finding William in the 1880 Census. It appears that the other children may have been scattered as I’ve been unable to find them either.

Marriage to Matilda T (Cooper) Elkins

Several researchers indicate that William Hunt Scott married Matilda T. Elkins (nee Cooper) on Dec 16, 1885, in Franklin County, IL. That seems likely, but I haven’t found compelling evidence that the William Scott that married Matilda was this William Scott.

I’ve been unable to find William or Matilda in the 1900 Census.

Death & Burial

Finally, some researchers indicate that William H Scott died 13 May 1903 in Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri. Again, I’ve been unable to verify that this William H Scott is my William Hunt Scott. There is a William Scott buried at the Glenda Cemetery, buried at Glenda Cemetery in Farmington. If you have evidence indicating this William Scott is the same one as above, I would love to hear from you.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Do a Family Study looking for William’s children post 1878.
  • Do a Family Study looking at William’s siblings.

————–  Disclaimer  ————–

 


 Sources

William Hunt Scott is person LYQC-SF4 on FamilySearch.

  • “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ­5WZ : 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360
  • “United States Census, 1860,” Census Place: Township 3 S Range 4 W, Washington, Illinois; Roll: M653_235; Page: 942; Family History Library Film: 803235
  • “United States Census, 1870,”
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6WN­2W2 : 17 October 2014), Sam Scott in household of Willin Scott, Illinois, United States; citing p. 18, family 122, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,778.
  • Chris H. Baily, The Jehu Scott Family (Eustis, FL, Chris H. Baily), Files (Personal), Person 10 – William Hunt Scott. Bailey, Chris, “The Jehu Scott Family” dated 7/16/16.
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 January 2019), memorial page for William H. Scott (unknown–13 May 1903), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13568645, citing Glenda Cemetery, Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri, USA; Maintained by Clara & Terry L. Luster, Sr. (contributor 46485785) .
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : 3 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-26N : 5 November 2017), Patience Marshall in an entry for Francis P. Scott and Florence E. Roberts, 24 Mar 1901; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.

Endnotes

[1] I have not independantly confirmed the ancestors of Samuel Kinkade. I am, however, confident that Samuel was William Hunt Scott’s father.

The Scotts of St. Clair County, Illinois – 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Roberts-Scott

William Hunt Scott, my 3rd great-grandfather, was born about 1834 in St. Clair County, Illinois. I followed him back from his being the head of the household to the 1850 Census and living in the household of his father Samuel Kinkade Scott at Turkey Hill, St. Clair County.[i] The 1850 household looked like:

  • Samuel K Scott 41     Farmer – Real Estate Value 1600
  • Elizabeth Scott 30     Keeping House
  • William H Scott 16     Farming
  • Sarah Scott         14    Attending School
  • Mary Scott          11     Attending School
  • Francis P Scott  10     Attending School
  • Emily Scott          5      Attending School
  • Rachel Scott        1

This household has every appearance of being a traditional home with husband, wife, and six children. I hoped I could continue back to the 1840 Census. Would the Samuel Scott family include all the children and fit the model of a traditional family or might there be some other individuals in the household.

The 1840 Census[ii]

Samuel K Scott – St Clair, Illinois

MALES   |   FEMALES

– 1 – – – 1 |   2 – – – 1 –

MALES

  • 5-10         1      Presumed to be William Hunter (Born 1830-1835)
  • 30-40      1      Clearly the Head of Household – Samuel K Scott (Born 1800-1810)

FEMALES

  • < 5            2       Presumed to be Sarah and Mary – (Both born 1835-1840)
  • 20-30      1      Presumed to be Elizabeth (Born 1810-1820)

All entries are consistent with the 1850 Census.

Conclusion

William Hunt Scott and his two oldest sisters are clearly enumerated in the 1840 Census. William won’t be in the 1830 Census and his father, Samuel was only 21 years old in 1830, very possibly in the household of his father, John Scott. I am looking forward to researching this family line back to the revolution.


ENDNOTES

[i] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 – Samuel K Scott. Year: 1850; Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8054/records/16536816/.

[ii] 1840 Census (NARA), 1840 Census – Samuel Scott – St Clair, Illinois. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch accessed: 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ-5WZ

Barnes – Surname Saturday

Roberts-Barnes
Surname Saturday

Barnes Name Origin & Meaning

Until we discover an immigrant Barnes ancestor, how the name was derived and its meaning is still elusive. If it is English, it probably relates to someone who lived by or worked at a barn. However, I could also come from “Barnes,” which is on the Thames in London. Likewise, it could refer to the son or the servant of a barne.

If the name derives from Old Norse or Irish the potential meanings are entirely different – ‘young warrior,’ ‘descendant of Bearán’ or possibly ‘spear.’

Once we discover the immigrant ancestor, we will have a better idea of the meaning of the surname in our case.

Geographical

Map showing location of St. Barthélémy.
Map showing St. Barthélémy by I. Hanhil.

Worldwide there are approximately 414,310 people who bear the Barnes surname.

It is most prevalent in the United States where over half of the people with the Barnes surname live. In little Saint-Barthélemy,  in the Caribbean, it is the 27th most common surname with one in 189 people with the surname of Barnes.

My Earliest Barnes Ancestors

I don’t know where or when my third great-grandfather, Joel Barnes, was born. However, my second great-grandfather, Nelson Barnes, was born in 1816, in Broome, Schoharie County, New York. This is in keeping with Barnes migration patterns. In 1840, 19% of the Barnes families in the United States lived in New York. About 1845 Nelson Barnes headed west to Indiana to settle the land there. Nelson had seven children born in Indiana before his death in 1884.

My great-grandfather, Joel Clinton Barnes, had 11 children, all born in Sullivan County, Indiana. I have not traced my Barnes family to any living male Barnes, yet. That said, Joel Clinton Barnes only had one son, Raye Barnes, who lived to adulthood. So, if you know a descendant of Raye, I would love to hear from you.

Joel Clinton Barnes had three brothers that lived to adulthood:

  • Theodore E. Barnes (1847-1919)
  • Abraham Barnes (1852-1921)
  • Cyrus John Barnes (1855-1879)

Any of their male descendants would also carry Nelson Barnes’ Y-DNA.

My Direct Barnes Ancestors

5.    Grandmother: Essie Pansy Barnes (1903-1982) – Family Search
10.  Great-grandfather: Joel Clinton Barnes(1857-1921) – Family Search
20.  2nd Great-grandfather: Nelson Barnes (1816-1884) – Family Search
40.  3rd Great-grandfather: Joel Barnes (____-____) – Family Search[i]

Joel Barnes Descendants

My records include 30 individuals with the Barnes surname and 177 direct-line descendants of Joel Barnes (the elder).

Sources:

Endnotes:


[i] Although Family Search indicates a birthdate and birthplace for Joel Barnes (the elder), I have not confirmed that information, so I am not using it here.