2nd Great-Grandaunt – Deidamia Darling (1813-?)

Following the children sometimes is the key.

By Don Taylor

This week I looked at the life of Deidamia Darling. She is the daughter of Abner Darling (1780-1839) and Sally Ann Munsell (1784-?). Through researching Deidamia, I learned that Sally Ann (Munsell) Darling didn’t vanish after the death of Abner. Instead, she was living with Deidamia and Lawrence Limbocker in 1870. By following the life of Deidamia, a 2nd great-grandaunt, I learned more about 3rd great-grandmother Sally Ann. I find following the descendants of an individual much more difficult than researching ancestors from the more recent to the further back than. But, through doing so I am able to discover new information.

Howell-Darling 2017 Research

List of Grandparents

Bio – Deidamia Darling (1813-?)

Deidamia Darling was born between 1812 and 1814. Probably 1813[i]. It is possible she was born on the Beekman Patent in Dutchess County, New York, but I believe she was more likely born in Paris, Oneida County, New York to Abner and Sally Ann (Munsell) Darling.

Deidamia grew up with seven siblings. They were

Abner moved his family west, first to Paris, Oneida County New York (before 1820) and again to Clarkson, Monroe County, New York.

About 1833, Deidamia married Lawrence G Limbocker[ii] It isn’t clear if they were married in New York or Michigan. Lawrence and Deidamia appear to have had three children. [iii].

Child Name Born Married Death
Abner D. Limbocker 1834 18xx – Amretta Quayle Unknown
Appolus F. Limbocker 1837 Mar 1870 – Almena Rose Boylson Unknown
Sarah Ann Limbocker 1838 2 Oct 1857 – Thomas J Foster Unknown

By 1934, Lawrence and Deidamia moved west to Michigan where their first son was born.

In 1837, Lawrence purchased 40 acres of land began farming it. The legal description of the property is Michigan, MICHIGAN-TOLEDO STRIP, Range 001E, Township 0035, Section 3, NW1⁄4SE1⁄4.

The 1840 Census finds Lawrence Limbocker living in Leoni Township, Jackson County, Michigan with 2 males & 1 female under 5 and 1 female 20 to 29.[iv] This fits the known family perfectly. Leoni is just east of Jackson, MI and about 30 miles west of Ann Arbor, MI.

The 1850 Census portrays a household consisting of Lawrence (L.B.), apparent wife “Drodana,” and three children, Abner, Apollos and Sarah A. Lawrence is farming the land and the three children are attending school.[v]

The 1860 Census show Lawrence and Deidamia living in Batavia, Branch County, Michigan. Their two sons are still living with them.[vi] Also living with them is Betsey Darling, age 70, born in New York. Who Betsey was is unknown. With the same surname as Deidamia, I presume Betsey is an unknown aunt of Deidamia.

In March of 1870, Lawrence and Deidamia’s son Apollos married Almena Rose Boylson. They were living with Lawrence and Deidamia during the 1870 census taken in June. Also living there was son Abner, who was working as a farm laborer. There is a 13-year-old girl, Dora Willie residing with them. I suspect she is Rose’s child from another marriage. Finally, there is Sally A Darling the 85-year-old mother of Deidamia living with them.[vii]

The last record I have found for Deidamia is 1880 Census which shows Lawrence and Deidamia living together in Batavia, Branch County, Michigan.[viii]

I have not discovered a record of Deidamia’s death. Nor have I found any evidence of her in the 1900 Census, I suspect Deidamia may have died between 1880 and 1900.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Determine Sally Ann’s death information. (high)
  • Determine Sally Ann’s location in 1860. (medium)
  • Determine who Betsey Darling (1790-?) is in relation to Deidamia.
  • Determine Deidamia’s death date and burial (low)

 Endnotes & Additional Sources

[i] The 1850 and 1860 Censuses indicate the was 36 and 46 respectively, and the 1870 and 1880 Census indicate she was 57 and 67 respectively. Because of the cultural stigma regarding the age of women, I believe the older age suggested is more likely. Thus, I believe she was born in 1812 or 1813.

[ii] Cross Index to Wills of Monroe County, New York, Monroe County Library, Page 54 of 98. Limbocker, Lawrence; Mich, wife, Diadema heir of Abner Darling, Clarkson. http://www.libraryweb.org/~digitized/books/Cross_index_to_wills_of_Monroe_County_1821-1863_Vol._1B.pdf.

[iii] In various records the Limbocker name is spelled different ways—Limbocker, Limbacker, and Lemboekor. I have standardized on Limbocker.

[iv] 1840 Census (A), Ancestry, Lowrence Limbocker (Lawrence Limbocker). Year: 1840; Census Place: Leoni, Jackson, Michigan; Roll: 206; Page: 160; Family History Library Film: 001479. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8057/records/3579923.

[v] 1850 Census (A) (NARA), Ancestry, L G Limbacker (Limbocker) – Giard, Branch, Michigan. 1850; Census Place: Girard, Branch, Michigan; Roll: M432_347; Page: 300B; Image: 66

[vi] 1860 Census (A), Ancestry, Lawrence Limbocker – Batavia, Branch, Michigan. Source Citation Year: 1860; Census Place: Batavia, Branch, Michigan; Roll: M653_538; Page: 734; Family History Library Film: 803538

[vii] 1870 Census (A), Ancestry, 1870 Census – Lawrence Limbocker – Batavia, Branch, Michigan.

[viii] 1880 Census (A), Lawrence Limbocker – Batavia, Branch, Michigan. Year: 1880; Census Place: Batavia, Branch, Michigan; Roll: 573; Family History Film: 1254573; Page: 462B; Enumeration District: 024

Sometimes the Census Taker is Wrong & Andrew Martin Darling

Sometimes the Census Taker is Wrong

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.I’ve been having many roadblocks in my Abner Darling (1780-1839) research. Enough so that I decided to take a step back and look at Abner Darling’s descendants much more closely. The first of these that I am examining is Andrew M Darling, the oldest brother of Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857). Rufus left New York for Kalamazoo, Michigan about 1844. Andrew left New York in the 1840s also and settled in Utica, Wisconsin. Then about 1859 Andrew moved west again, this time to Alexandria, Minnesota. Andrew died in 1864. I looked and looked and looked and couldn’t find Andrew in the 1860 census.  Finally, I searched for everyone named Andrew in Douglas County, Minnesota. There I found an Andrew Martin, whose apparent wife was Antoinette, and three children, Sarah, Olive, and Abram who matched the ages of Andrew Darling’s Wife Antoinette, and three children, Sarah, Olive, and Abner. I have little doubt that I found the family. Now my suspicion is that Martin was Andrew’s middle name, the “M.” I’ve known about for quite some time. The census taker just got the name wrong, a simple mistake. The Darlings were new in the area and the census taker probably didn’t know them yet.

Howell-Darling 2017 Research

List of Grandparents

Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling (1907-1969)
1st Great-grandfather: Rufus Harry Darling (1857-1917)
2nd Great-grandfather: Rufus Holton Darling (1816-1857)
2nd Great-grand Uncle: Andrew M. [Martin?] Darling (1805-1864)

 

Andrew Martin Darling (1805-1864)

Andrew M. Darling was born in 1805 or 1806 in New York, probably on the Beekman Patent in Dutchess County to Abner and Sally Ann (Munsell) Darling.

SOS Online BackupAndrew grew up with 7 siblings. They were

  • Diadema Darling
  • Sally Ann Darling
  • Abner Darling
  • Rufus Holton Darling(1816-1857)
  • Henry W Darling
  • Hannah Darling
  • Franklin C Darling

Abner moved his family west, first to Paris, Oneida County, New York (before 1820) and again to Clarkson, Monroe County, New York.

Sometime before 1835 Andrew moved west, apparently by himself, to Medina, Ohio. There he married Esther Antoinette Doolittle on October 8th, 1835 in a ceremony performed by Joel Goodell, a Minister of the Gospel. Andrew and Antoinette appear to have had four children.

Children of Andrew M. Darling and Esther Antoinette Doolittle

Child Name Born Married Death
Sarah Antoinette Darling c. 1844 1863 – James Dicken 1901
Alice Darling c. 1846 Before 1860
Abner M Darling 1851 Ella [LNU]* Unknown
Olive Blanche Darling 1854 c. 1869 – George McQuillen 1902

I have not found Andrew in the 1840 Census. All four of the children above were born in Wisconsin, so it is clear that Andrew and Antoinette located to Utica, Winnebago County, Wisconsin before 1844.

The 1850 Census shows a three generation household. With Andrew is his wife, Antonette and their daughters, Sarah and Alice.  This census record provides the only mention of Alice that I have found. Also living with Andrew is his mother, Sally A [Munsell] Darling, and his two youngest siblings, 25-year-old Hannah and 22-year-old Franklin.

The 1855 Wisconsin Census shows the family still in Utica, WI with a household consisting of 3 males. (Most likely Andrew, his son Abner, and his brother Franklin.) The household also has four females. (Most likely Esther Antoinette, Sarah, and Olive. Additionally, either Alice was still alive in 1855 and Hannah moved on, or Alice had died by 1855 and Hannah was still there. Further research is needed to discern what occurred.

Map showing Darling Homestead
Part of Douglan County, MN – Click map to see larger image

The family moved west again, this time, in 1859, to Douglas County, Minnesota. The 1860 Census shows the family with the surname “Martin.” Clearly a mistake.  Living with Andrew is his wife, 44-year-old Antoinette; his 16-year-old daughter, Sarah; his twelve-year-old daughter, Olive; and his eight-year-old son, Abner (listed as Abram).

It appears that Andrew died in September 1864 in Phelps County, Missouri. However, his family continued to prosper in Douglas County. He was said to have been an “exceptionally successful farmer.[i]” His wife Antoinette received a patent in 1873 for 149.1 acres of land they settled on the south shore of Lake Darling (near Alexandria, Minnesota)[ii]. Lake Darling was named for Andrew Darling[iii].

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Determine if the three males in the 1855 Wisconsin Census includes Andrew’s brother Franklin or if there is an unknown child of Andrew.
  • Determine if the four females in the 1855 Wisconsin Census includes Alice or if the 4th female is Hannah. Was Alice was still alive in 1855 and Hannah moved on, or Alice had died by 1855 and Hannah was still there.

Sources

  • 1850 Census (FS), 1850 Census – A M Darling – Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin. “United States Census, 1850,” database with images, Family Search – 12 April 2016), Am Darling, Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin, United States; citing family 1092, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4DT-3L6.
  • 1855 WI Census, Family Search, 1855 – A. M. Darling – Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin. “Wisconsin State Census, 1855,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MMM5-5DV 14 November 2014), A. M. Darling, Utica, Winnebago, Wisconsin; citing line 12, State Historical Society, Madison; FHL microfilm 1,032,689.
  • 1860 Census, Family Search, 1860 – Andrew M Martin [Darling] – Alexandria, Douglas, Minnesota. “United States Census, 1860”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4LG-PBH – 26 July 2017), Andrew M Martin, 1860.
  • Martin, William Albert, and Lou Ella Johnson Martin, Dennis Darling: of Braintree and Mendon and some of his descendants 1662-1800 – Page 461.
  • Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 , Family Search, Andrews Darling & Antoinett Doolittle – Marriage. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch  27 September 2017, Andrews M. Darling and Antoineth Doolittle, 08 Oct 1835; citing Medina, Ohio, United States, reference 132; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 423,817. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ5X-M24.
  • Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013 , Family Search, Andrews Darling & Antoinette Doolittle – Intended Marriage. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 27 September 2017), Andrews W. Darling and Antoinett Doolittle, 25 Sep 1835; citing Medina, Ohio, United States, reference 83; county courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 423,817. https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XZ5X-GTR.
  • Wisconsin, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1820-1890, Ancestry, WI 1855 State Census Index – A. M. Darling – No Image Winnebago County, Utica Township, 1855

 Endnotes & Additional Sources

[i] Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 180.

[ii] Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, Accession MN0950.303 – Darling, Antoinette 11/15/1873. https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/patent/default.aspx?accession=MN0950__.303&docClass=STA&sid=swuujfdu.p5v.

[iii] Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 180.

The name is different but the same.

Darling/Huber/Trumpi Line
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The mother of great-grand uncle Ernest Lorraine Trumpy [Trümpi] has long been a question. His father, Bernard Trümpi has long been known, but his mother has been something of a mystery. You see, family oral history said that Bernard’s first wife’s name was Bertha, and his second wife’s name was also named Bertha. And to great-grandmother Bertha Barbara Trumpi I had ascribed the surname of Koch to the mother of Bertha Barbara (Trumpi) Huber and “unknown” as the surname for her step-mother, Bertha.

Detail of Ernest Trumpi’s death certificate

Then, cousin Carl sent me a copy of the death certificate of Ernest L. Trumpy. It showed the name of his mother as Bertha Cook. The informant was Ernest’s sister, so I was confident she would know Ernest’s mother’s surname.  My initial thought was, “Wow – I finally have the names.”  Bertha Barbara’s (the oldest child in the family) mother was Bertha Koch and Ernest’s (the youngest child in the family) mother was Bertha Cook. Got it.

Something was niggling at me though.  Maybe it was my subconscious, maybe it was intuition, in any event I decided to look up “Cook” in Google Translate.  Sure enough, it came back, “cook” in English is “Koch” in German. The same name was just translated by Frieda. That tells me that Bertha Barbara’s mother’s surname is unknown and her stepmother’s surname is Koch/Cook, not the other way around.

Thanks to cousin Carl I have a better idea of the family relationships.

List of Grandparents

  • 1st Great-grandmother: Bertha Barbara Trumpi [Trümpi]
    • 2nd Great-grandfather: Bernard Trümpi
    • 2nd Great-grandmother: Bertha [Trümpi]
      • 2nd Step great-grandmother: Bertha Koch/Cook
  • Great Grand Uncle Ernest Lorraine Trumpy [Trumpi] (Bertha Barbara’s brother)

Sources:

Indiana Death Certificates (Illinois State Board of Health), Indiana Death Certificate – Ernest L Trumpy.

 

 

 

 

Margaret Lambe’s Prayer Book

Mini-Review of CamScanner

Treasure Chest Thursday
Darling/McAllister/Lambe

By Don Taylor

CamScanner LogoI love software that helps digitize documents nicely. Some time ago I added CamScanner by INTSIG Information Co., Ltd to my phone. It allows a person to take a photo of a document with your phone. Once the photo is taken you select the area you desire and the software automagically adjusts the photo to be a flat image. That way you don’t have to be exactly centered over a document. That can really help if a flash is needed or if the pages can’ It is easy to transfer the image to your computer via the internet. The only problem with the software I’ve found is operator error. When my wife and I were visiting my wife’s mother I used CamScanner to “scan” some pages from Margaret Lambe’s Prayer Book. I took the photos, cropped them, then moved on. It wasn’t until I got home and saw the images on a much larger screen that I saw my operator error.  I had cropped the photos too close and missed some detail. Not so badly that I can’t use the images, but badly enough to remind myself that it is easy to crop the photos too severely and I need to be more careful.

On the same day that Margaret Lambe received a Bible from she also received “The Book of Common Prayer.” The inscription in the prayer book is much more legible than it was in her Bible and clearly shows it was received from Rev. Wm Cassidi. (I’ve adjusted the person in the post about the Bible to reflect the name more legible in this image.) The bad part is that through operator error, I cut off the “e” in Lambe and the “di” in Cassidi. Oops.

Having a small Bible and a “Book of Common Prayer” was an important part of the religious life of 19th Century parishioners in the Church of England and I’m sure these two books were important gifts to the 17-year-old Margaret.

Inscription - Book of Common Prayer to Margaret Lambe
Inscription – Book of Common Prayer to Margaret Lambe

The Inscription reads:

Margaret Lambe
With the best
Wishes of
The Rev. Wm Cassidi
Grindon
April 30, 1877.

I am still unclear what “Grindon” is or what it means. Had I seen only this inscription, I would have surmised it was the Reverend’s surname. However, the Bible inscription appears to be something separate from his surname so I’m still confused.  have some difficulty making out some of the words, and have tried my best. I’m not confident of Mr. McCassidi’s first name nor of the word below the line.

Like the Bible, on a second inscription page, it shows the book went to

Elizabeth Darling Kemon
Born March 22, 1906
granddaughter of
Margaret Lamb

Again, Elizabeth had no children, so she passed it on to the “niece of Betty Kemon.”

Conclusion

  • I need to be more careful when cropping images using CamScanner.
  • Sometimes two inscriptions by the same person in two places can help reading and transcribing transcriptions.

Margaret Lambe’s Bible

Treasure Chest Thursday
Darling/McAllister/Lambe

By Don Taylor

My wife and I recently visited her mother. During the visit, our conversations revealed that there was an old Bible that my wife’s great-great-grandmother, Margaret Mary (Lambe) McAllister, was gifted with. The Bible was printed in M.DCCC.LXXIV (1876) and contains both the Old and New Testaments.

The bible is inscribed to:

Inscription gifting Bible to Margaret Lamb.
Inscription gifting Bible to Margaret Lamb.

Margaret Lamb,

With the best wishes of

The Rev. Wm Cassidi.

April 30th 1877

– – – – – – –

??Grindon??

I have some difficulty making out some of the words and have tried my best. I’m not confident of Mr. McCassidi’s first name nor of the word below the line.

Margaret Lamb was born on 28 April 1860, so, in 1877 she would have just turned 17 and was being let loose into the world. Margaret married Peter McAllister over a year later, on 22 August 1878, so it appears to have been a “coming out” type of gift.  I don’t know who Mr. McCassidi is but I would expect him to be a relative or a close family friend.

On a second inscription page, it shows the book went to

Inscription gifting Bible to Elizabeth Darling Kemon. (page cropped)

Elizabeth Darling Kemon
Born March 22, 1906
granddaughter of
Margaret Lamb

Elizabeth had no children, so she passed it on to her oldest niece, my mother-in-law. A third inscription records that transfer and provides name, birthdate, and relationship to Elizabeth Kemon.

Conclusion

Holy Bible Cover Page

Besides being a valuable family heirloom, old bibles often provide important genealogical information. Even though this small, pocket-sized bible didn’t have a set of center pages for family history details, the inscriptions provided important information. In this case, a clue to a possible relative or family friend and the birthdate for Elizabeth (Darling) Kemon and their relationships.