Margaret Lambe’s Prayer Book

Mini-Review of CamScanner

Treasure Chest Thursday
Darling/McAllister/Lambe

By Don Taylor

CamScanner LogoI love software that helps digitize documents nicely. Some time ago I added CamScanner by INTSIG Information Co., Ltd to my phone. It allows a person to take a photo of a document with your phone. Once the photo is taken you select the area you desire and the software automagically adjusts the photo to be a flat image. That way you don’t have to be exactly centered over a document. That can really help if a flash is needed or if the pages can’ It is easy to transfer the image to your computer via the internet. The only problem with the software I’ve found is operator error. When my wife and I were visiting my wife’s mother I used CamScanner to “scan” some pages from Margaret Lambe’s Prayer Book. I took the photos, cropped them, then moved on. It wasn’t until I got home and saw the images on a much larger screen that I saw my operator error.  I had cropped the photos too close and missed some detail. Not so badly that I can’t use the images, but badly enough to remind myself that it is easy to crop the photos too severely and I need to be more careful.

On the same day that Margaret Lambe received a Bible from she also received “The Book of Common Prayer.” The inscription in the prayer book is much more legible than it was in her Bible and clearly shows it was received from Rev. Wm Cassidi. (I’ve adjusted the person in the post about the Bible to reflect the name more legible in this image.) The bad part is that through operator error, I cut off the “e” in Lambe and the “di” in Cassidi. Oops.

Having a small Bible and a “Book of Common Prayer” was an important part of the religious life of 19th Century parishioners in the Church of England and I’m sure these two books were important gifts to the 17-year-old Margaret.

Inscription - Book of Common Prayer to Margaret Lambe
Inscription – Book of Common Prayer to Margaret Lambe

The Inscription reads:

Margaret Lambe
With the best
Wishes of
The Rev. Wm Cassidi
Grindon
April 30, 1877.

I am still unclear what “Grindon” is or what it means. Had I seen only this inscription, I would have surmised it was the Reverend’s surname. However, the Bible inscription appears to be something separate from his surname so I’m still confused.  have some difficulty making out some of the words, and have tried my best. I’m not confident of Mr. McCassidi’s first name nor of the word below the line.

Like the Bible, on a second inscription page, it shows the book went to

Elizabeth Darling Kemon
Born March 22, 1906
granddaughter of
Margaret Lamb

Again, Elizabeth had no children, so she passed it on to the “niece of Betty Kemon.”

Conclusion

  • I need to be more careful when cropping images using CamScanner.
  • Sometimes two inscriptions by the same person in two places can help reading and transcribing transcriptions.

Margaret Lambe’s Bible

Treasure Chest Thursday
Darling/McAllister/Lambe

By Don Taylor

My wife and I recently visited her mother. During the visit, our conversations revealed that there was an old Bible that my wife’s great-great-grandmother, Margaret Mary (Lambe) McAllister, was gifted with. The Bible was printed in M.DCCC.LXXIV (1876) and contains both the Old and New Testaments.

The bible is inscribed to:

Inscription gifting Bible to Margaret Lamb.
Inscription gifting Bible to Margaret Lamb.

Margaret Lamb,

With the best wishes of

The Rev. Wm Cassidi.

April 30th 1877

– – – – – – –

??Grindon??

I have some difficulty making out some of the words and have tried my best. I’m not confident of Mr. McCassidi’s first name nor of the word below the line.

Margaret Lamb was born on 28 April 1860, so, in 1877 she would have just turned 17 and was being let loose into the world. Margaret married Peter McAllister over a year later, on 22 August 1878, so it appears to have been a “coming out” type of gift.  I don’t know who Mr. McCassidi is but I would expect him to be a relative or a close family friend.

On a second inscription page, it shows the book went to

Inscription gifting Bible to Elizabeth Darling Kemon. (page cropped)

Elizabeth Darling Kemon
Born March 22, 1906
granddaughter of
Margaret Lamb

Elizabeth had no children, so she passed it on to her oldest niece, my mother-in-law. A third inscription records that transfer and provides name, birthdate, and relationship to Elizabeth Kemon.

Conclusion

Holy Bible Cover Page

Besides being a valuable family heirloom, old bibles often provide important genealogical information. Even though this small, pocket-sized bible didn’t have a set of center pages for family history details, the inscriptions provided important information. In this case, a clue to a possible relative or family friend and the birthdate for Elizabeth (Darling) Kemon and their relationships.

Darling – Surname Saturday

Darling
Surname Saturday
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.According to Forebears, dyrling was an “Old English term used to denote the young noble of a house, perhaps exclusively the eldest son, on whom all expectations rested.” Later it became a family name[i].  Ancestry reports that the name is English and Scottish and derives from deorling meaning “beloved one” or as a derivative form of deor (dear)[ii]. In either case, it became a surname before 1500.

Geographic

The Darling surname is most common in the United States and England with nearly half of all people with the Darling surname living in the United States. In terms of frequency, it is most common in Canada with 1 in 13,078 people in Canada having the surname.[iii]

The 1920 census indicates that the greatest number of families with the Darling surname were New York, Michigan, and Massachusetts. During the 1880 Census, the greatest number of Darling families were in New York and Massachusetts. Finally, the 1840 Census indicated most of the Darling families lived in New York[iv].

Ancestor Migration

That pattern follows my wife’s ancestors nicely. Her Darling ancestors came to the Colonies in the mid-1600s and settled in Mendon, Massachusetts. They relocated to Eastern New York (Dutchess County) about 1740. They continued west and settled in Oneida County, in western New York about 1800. They lived in Monroe County, NY, in far western New York, for a short time as well. They moved further west again to settle in Kalamazoo, Michigan about 1845.

Other Darling family members located in Missouri and some continued out west to California. Whenever I hear about the migrations west, I think about my wife’s Darling family being clear representatives of the time.

It is not clear when Mary-Alice’s earliest known Darling ancestor came to the Colonies.

But, her 7th great-grandfather, Dennis Darling married Hannah Francis in Braintree, MA in 1662.[v] By 1678 they had moved 40 miles west to Mendon, MA.[vi] His son Benjamin was born and died in Mendon, but his son, Ebenezer, migrated to the Beekman Patent land in New York before 1740. His son, Abner, moved west to Oneida County about 1800. Abner’s son, also named Abner, moved further west to Monroe county, NY about 1830. His son, Rufus Holton, moved on to Kalamazoo, Michigan, about 1844. Rufus’ son, also named Rufus, was born and died in Kalamazoo.

Rufus Harry was a railroad man. Besides Kalamazoo, he lived in Chicago, Kansas City, and Pittsburgh; his son Robert was born when Rufus was in the Pittsburgh area. Robert died in Michigan.

Map of Ancestral Darling Migrations
Ancestral Darling migration. 1660-1900 from the east to the west.

Direct Darling Ancestors

# 006 – G Robert Harry Darling (1905-1969)
# 012 – GG Rufus Harry Darling (1857-1917)
# 024 – 2nd GG Rufus Holton Darling (1815-1857)
# 048 – 3rd GG Abner Darling (Jr.) (1780-1839)
# 096 – 4th GG Abner Darling (Sr.) (1747-1800)
# 192 – 5th GG Ebenezer Darling (1718-1790)
# 384 – 6th GG Benjamin Darling (1687-1772)
# 768 – 7th GG Dennis Darling (1640-1717)

Known relatives.

My records have 233 direct-line descendants of Dennis Darling identified in my family tree, which is about 8% of my total Howell/Darling ancestors.


ENDNOTES

[i] Internet: Forebears website – Darling Surname. See: http://forebears.io/surnames/darling

[ii] Internet: Ancestry website – Darling Family History. See: https://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Darling

[iii] See note i above.

[iv] See note ii above.

[v] Clemens, William M., Darling Family in America, The (1913), Archive.Org, Page 5 & 6 – Dennis Darling of Braintree, Mass.

[vi] Doherty, Frank J., Darling Family, The – Settlers of the Beekman Patent, The, Files, 0 – Introduction – Dennis Darling (c. 1640-1717).

Ancestor Bio – Elishaba Smith

52 Ancestors – Week 191
By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.Elishaba Smith was born, lived her entire life, and died in New London County, Connecticut. What makes that statement so odd and what provided such a source for learning for me was that I learned that there is no county government nor county seat for New London County.  There isn’t a county government in any of Connecticut’s eight counties. In Connecticut, the towns are responsible for all local government. Although some neighboring towns might share resources, water, gas, the county is a mapping convention and has no government.

Darling-Huber 2017 – Ancestor #99

List of Grandparents

  • Grandfather: Robert Harry Darling
  • 1st Great-grandfather: Rufus Harry Darling
  • 2nd Great-grandfather: Rufus Holton Darling
  • 3rd Great-grandmother: Sally Ann Munsell
  • 4th Great-grandmother: Elishaba Smith
  • 5th Great-grandfather: Hezekiah Smith

 

Elishaba Smith (1748-1803)

Elishaba Smith was born on either 15 or 16 February 1747 in Lyme, New London. She was the child of Hezekiah and Sarah (Chadwick) Smith.

Childhood

Connecticut was an up-and-coming place in the mid 1700s. In 1758 the New London Summary was founded by Timothy Green. The newspaper was discontinued when Timothy Green died in 1763. However, the paper was immediately replaced by Timothy Green’s nephew, also named Timothy Green, with the New London Gazette.

Marriage

Elishaba married Timothy Munsell in Lyme on 11 Feb 1768.

They had seven children.

Children of Timothy and Elishaba (Smith) Munsell

Child Born Died
William Wescott Munsell 24 Jan 1770 20 Jan 1867
James Munsell 28 Jun 1773
Anna Munsell 07 Sep 1775 18 Jun 1777
Timothy Munsell 16 Apr 1778
Thomas Munsell Abt. 1784 1849
James Andross Munsell 09 Jul 1781 Abt. 1845
Sally Ann Munsell Abt. 1786 Unknown

Adult

Leaf1790 Census shows the Timothy Munsell family living in New London. It indicates three males living there under the age of 16.  Timothy (Age 12), James Andross (Age 9), and Thomas (Age 6) would have been the correct ages to fit the family.  William Wescott was born in 1770 and would have been 20 at the time so he must have lived elsewhere.

The census record also shows two females in the household. Elishaba (age 43) and Sally Ann (age 10)

1798 – Timothy Munsell died leaving Elishaba a widow.

1800 Census show Elishaba Munsell as the head of household. Living with her is one female between 10 and 16 years of age who is presumed to be Sally Ann who was born between 1784 and 1786.

Death

Elishaba Munsell died on 16 Sep 1803. Her burial location is unknown.



Sources

 

 

 

Drexl Project – Ursula Eggert (1860-1946)

Ancestor Biography – Ursula Eggert (1860-1946)

By Don Taylor

Photo of Don Taylor with cat Nasi.The mother of thirteen, Ursula Eggert Drexl immigrated from Germany with her husband and children in 1884. Her youngest child died on the ship during the crossing. She worked as a jeweler for a short time but primarily raised her children.

Drexl Project – Ancestor #13

List of Grandparents

  • 6          Grandfather:                          Nicholas Edward Drexl
  • 12       Great-grandmother:           Ursula Eggert
  • 24       2nd Great-grandfather:         Johann Baptist Eggert

Ursula Eggert (1860-1946)

Ursula was born in September 1860 to Johann Baptist and Ursula (Hohenadel) Eggert in Bavaria, Germany.

Childhood

Her father, Johann Baptist Eggert died when she was only nine years old, on 23 May 1870. It appears that her first child, Nicholas Edward Drexl, was born on 29 November 1880 in Bavaria, Germany, almost a year before her marriage to Frank Xaver Drexl.

Marriage

She married Frank Xaver Drexl on 25 October 1881 in Petzenhausen, Baveria, Germany.

Children of Frank Xaver and Ursula (Eggert) Drexl

Birth Marriage Death
Nicholas Edward 1880, Germany 1904 – Hedwig Frances Stoeger 1939, Missouri
Christina Innocencia 1882, Germany 1902 – Frank Matschinger 1963, Minnesota
Edward 1883, Germany N/A 1884, at sea
Franz Xaver 1884, Kansas N/A 1886, Kansas
Anna 1885, Kansas N/A 1899, Minnesota
Francis Theresia 1886, Kansas 1911 – [?] Wallace 1949, California
Katherine Agatha 1888, Kansas 1910 – [?] Wikstrom 1961, Minnesota
Marie Barbara 1890, Kansas 1909 = Michael J. Gallagher 1975, Minnesota
Joseph Peter 1893, Minnesota ? – Violet Gertrude Weldon 1966, Minnesota
Charles Mathias 1894, Minnesota ? – Catherine Classen 1970, California
John 1896, Minnesota N/A 1899, Minnesota
Frank John Joseph 1899, Minnesota ? – Bernice Frances ? 1969, Minnesota
Anthony John 1902, Minnesota ? – Louise Opperman 1955, Minnesota

Immigration

The young family, Frank and a very pregnant Ursula along with their three children immigrated to the United States in 1884. Their youngest, Edward died on the voyage and was buried at sea. The family located to Leavenworth, Kansas, where their son Franz Xaver was born on 29 April 1884.

1886 was a tough year. Ursula’s mother, Ursula, died on 11 February. Also, the death of two-year-old Franz in 1886 must have been devastating. The family moved from Leavenworth twenty-five miles NW to Atchison, Kansas that year. Francis Theresia was born on 4 August in Atchison, Kansas.

Minnesota

Sometime between 1888 and 1893 the family located to Minnesota.

In 1895, Frank and Ursula lived at 258 Custer Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota with 7 of their children, Nick, Christina, Francis, Katie, Mary, Joseph, and Charles.

In 1900, Frank and Ursula lived at 260 Custer Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota with 8 of their children, Nicholas, Christina, Francis, Katherine, Marie, Joseph, Charles, and Frank.  Ursula was working as a jeweler.

In 1905, Frank and Ursula lived at 46 Robie, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota. Francis, Catherine, Mary are shown in the 1905 census. The other children were apparently left off the census report

In 1910, Frank and Ursula lived at 26 Winifred Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota with six of their children, Francis, Kate, Joseph, Charles, Frank, and Anthony.

Photo of 35 West Isabel (Oct 2016) per Google Maps
35 West Isabel (Oct 2016) per Google Maps

In 1920, Frank and Ursula lived at 35 W. Isabel, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota, with three of their children, Joseph, Frank, and Mari (now Gallagher) and Mari’s daughter, Catherine Gallagher.

Urusla’s husband, Frank Xaver Drexl died on 4 November 1929 in Saint Paul, Minnesota. He is buried at Calvary Cemetery in Saint Paul.

In 1930, Ursula sill was living at 35 W. Isabel, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota, however, now her son, Joseph, his wife Violet, and Ursula’s daughter Frances (now Wallace) were living with her.

 

In 1932, Ursula moved to 1576 Goodrich Ave, Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota.

Ursula moved to 535 Hall Ave. Saint Paul, Ramsey County Minnesota sometime before 1944.

Death

Ursula died on 16 May 1946 in Ramsey County Minnesota. Her burial location is unknown.


Sources

  • 1895 Minnesota State Census, 1895, Drexl, Frank – St. Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota.
  • 1900 US Federal Census (FS), Frank Drexl – Head – Saint Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota – Sheet 8.
  • 1905 Minnesota State Census, Frank Drexl – Saint Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota, ED 27, Sheet 40 – #76.
  • 1910 US Federal Census (FS) (n.p: NARA, n.d), Frank Drexl -Head – St Paul Ward 6, Ramsey, Minnesota, ED 84, Sheet 2B, Line 70        .
  • 1920 US Federal Census (FS), Frank Drexel (Drexl) – Head- Saint Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota.
  • 1930 US Federal Census – Ursula Drexl – Saint Paul, Ramsey, Minnesota – ED 62-67 – Sheet 11B – (AA), Line 53 – Ursula Drexl – Head.
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1928), ; digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/13165605 ).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1929), Page 387, Drexl; digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/14281703 ).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1931), Page 371, Drexl; digital img, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/14900466).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1932), Page 337, Drexl; digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/14900466 ).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1934), Page 285, Drexl; digital img, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/14660986 ).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1935), Page 290, Drexl; digital image, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/2469/15032341 ).
  • U.S. City Directories, 1822­1995: Saint Paul, MN (N.p.: R. L. Polk & Co., 1944), Page 260, Drexel/Drexl; digital image, Ancestry (http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=USDirectories&h=803751586 ).
  • Minnesota Births and Christenings, 1840-­1980, [Frank J] Drexl – 16 Sep 1899.
  • Ancestry Family Trees, M A Heintz Family Tree – Owner: mavendegna.
  • Family Search Family Trees – Ursula Eggert – KLX8-S2T https://familysearch.org/tree/person/KLX8-S2T