Barnett Surname

Surname Saturday

Brown/Manning/Barnett

I only have one known direct Barnett ancestor, my 5th great grandmother, Catherine Barnett (Ancestor #209) on the Brown line. However, I have some 35 other known Barnetts identified in my family tree. Several Barnetts married into the Mannin and Brown families in my research, so even though I only have one direct Barnett ancestor, the Barnett surname is important in my research.
  

Barnett Name Meaning

There are two major threads of discussion regarding the meaning of the surname Barnett.
First is that it is a habitational name, relating to where people lived. Once source suggests that the name comes from a town in Hertfordshire, and the name of several parishes in that county. It also suggests it refers to towns in Middlesex and Lincoln.[i] Another source suggests the name derives from Old English bærnet ‘place cleared by burning’.[ii]
A second thread indicates that the name is a variant of Bernard or “the son of Barnard”.[iii] Barnard was a popular name in the 13th century and the Cistercian monk, Saint Barnard, provided impetus to the name’s use. Other popular variants of Barnett include Barnet and Barnette.

Geographical

I do not know where Catherine Barnett or her ancestors came from. But a good guess would be from England. The New York Passenger Lists on Ancestry indicates that more than half of the New York Passengers with the surname Barnett came from England. My Catherine was probably born in Virginia about 1782. If that is the case, her ancestors never immigrated, rather they just relocated to the colonies.

In1840 there were 71 Barnett households in Virginia and another 119 in Kentucky.[iv] Although Catherine married Meredith Mannin about 1797, I’m sure she had plenty of Barnett relatives in the area. Catherine appears to have died in Kentucky sometime before 1862.           

My Direct Barnett Ancestors

#209 – Catherine Barnett (1782-c.1862) – Generation 8
#104 – Meridith Mannin (1801-1885) – Generation 7
#52 – Enoch Mannin (1819-1907) – Generations 6
#26 – John William Manning (1845-1888) – Generations 5
#13 – Mary Elizabeth Manning (1874-1983) – Generation 4
#6 – Richard Earl Brown (1903-1990) (aka Richard Durand, aka Clifford Brown) – G3
My mother – Generation 2
Me – Generation 1

My known relatives.

My records have 865 direct-line descendants of Catherine Barnett identified in my known Brown/Montran tree, which is about 19% of my entire tree are descendants of Catherine Barnett.

ENDNOTES

[i] Patronymica Britannica, written: 1838-1860 by Mark Antony Lower via Forebears http://forebears.io/surnames/barnett#meaning
[ii] Source: Dictionary of American Family Names ©2013, Oxford University Press via Ancestry http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Barnett
[iii] ibid.
[iv] Barnett Family History, Ancestry; http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=barnett

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Bio – Barney Brown (c. 1813-c 1865)

Brown

By – Don Taylor

Barney/Daney Brown is my third great-grandfather on my mother’s paternal line. I have not found much Barney or his life. In fact, I have only found him in two census records, which is barely enough to prove even his existence. But, this is what I think I know.

c. 1813 – Born in New Hampshire.
c. 1840 – Married Mary C. (Unknown).
c. 1842 – Son, William Henry born in Michigan.
c. 1845 – Son, Myron O. born in Michigan.
    1850 – Lived near Seline, Washtenaw County, Michigan
c. 1852 – Daughter, Alice C. born in Michigan.
c. 1855 – Don, David V. born in Michigan.
    1860 – Lived near Seline, Washtenaw County, Michigan
c. 1865 – Died (Probably near Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan

Discussion

According to the 1850 and the 1860 Censuses, Barney was 36 and 46 years-old respectively which indicates he was born in 1813 or 1814. Both censuses show that he was born in New Hampshire. Several other researchers suggest that his father was Odell Brown, and his mother’s name was Jane, however, I have not managed to confirm those names. Also, some researchers indicate that he had a brother, David, who was born about 1810.

In the 1850 Census he is named Barney; in the 1860 Census, he is called Daney. This name change leads to some confusion, which is why I call him Barney/Daney. When I find additional documentation, I will correct the name as appropriate.

I know nothing of his childhood, other than he apparently had an older brother.

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney in the 1840 Census. It is likely he was living with his family in New Hampshire, Michigan, or somewhere in between. The 1840 Census only names the heads of households, so if Barney/Daney was living with his father or another person, the 26-year-old would not be listed.

He appears to have left New Hampshire and located in Michigan sometime before 1842 because his oldest son was born in Michigan.

He appears to have married Mary C. (Unknown) about 1840. This marriage is based solely on my knowing his oldest known son, William Henry Brown, being born in 1842. It is not clear if he married Mary C. before he located to Michigan after he settled in Saline, Michigan, or elsewhere.

Barney/Daney and Jane appear to have had four children.[1]

They are:

William Henry Brown (1842-?)
Myron O. Brown (1845-?)
Alice C. Brown (1852-?)
David V. Brown (1855)

In 1850, Barney was living with his wife, Mary, and two children, William Henry and Myron O. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan as a farmer[2].

In 1860, Barney was living with his wife, Mary, and four children, Henry W., Myron O., Alice C., and David V. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan as a farmer.[3] Living with the Browns was a Melvina Miller, age 17 who was a domestic and also attended school.[4]

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney in the 1870 Census. I did find his wife in the 1870 census living as a widow with Henry & Ann Davidson in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan. Because of that, I believe that Barney/Daney died sometime between 1860 and 1870.

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney’s burial location.

Further Actions:

Determine Barney/Daney’s preferred name, also the date and place of his birth.
Determine Barney/Daney’s date and place of death.
Determine Barney/Daney’s location during the 1820, 1830, and 1840 Censuses.
Follow the other children through the censuses.
Confirm that Odell and Jane Brown were his parents.
Determine Barney/Daney’s wife maiden name.

List of Greats

Arthur Durwood Brown
William Henry Brown
Barney/Daney Brown
Odell Brown?????

ENDNOTES

[1] The 1860 Census, Population Schedule, does not include family relationships. Consequently, identifying the relationships as parents/children from those records is speculative. William H and Myron O lived with Barney & Mary during the 1850 Census. “Henry W.” and the other children lived with Daney & Mary during the 1860 Census.
[2] 1850 Census; Barney Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8P-F8S
[3] 1860 Census; Daney (Barney) Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Family Search; Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Family 644; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDZ-DLM
[4] Ibid.
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Barber – Surname Lost?

Barber

Surname Saturday

Name Origin:

A barber cutting hair - Source: Pixabay Barber is an occupational name for a barber. Barbers of old not only cut hair and shaved beards, but also practiced surgery and pulled teeth.[i]

Today (2014 data), there are 86,641 people with the Barber surname in the United States, the most of any nation. In terms of rank within a nation, there are proportionally more people with the Barber surname in England, Wales, and Australia.[ii]

My Earliest Ancestor:

My earliest known Barber ancestor is my 2nd great grandfather, Franklin E Barber. Frank, as he was known, was born December, 1836 in Ohio.[iii]


In most of the census records Frank’s occupation was a painter. According to Ancestry.Com there were 147 Barber families enumerated in the 1840 Census. From the 1880 Census, we know his father was born in New York and his mother was born in Vermont.

I know nothing of his early life and only recently found him as Elisha F Barber in the 1870 Census living Trumbull county, Ohio. I need to confirm this finding though, because it appears that he and Sarah Blackhurst married in Albion, Michigan in 1869 and located in Ohio immediately after the marriage. Then they apparently moved back to Albion to be there during the 1880 Census.

Franklin and Sarah had two daughters, Ida Mae and Eva Louisa. With them the Barber name was lost from Frank’s descendants.

I still have not determined who Frank’s parents were. With only 147 Barber families in Ohio in 1840, I believe it may be possible to determine his family in Ohio. If I can, it may be that he will have siblings that carried the Barber name on.

Frank died on April 7, 1917 at the Grand Rapids Veterans Home. His is buried at the Grand Rapids Veterans Home Cemetery at plot 7, row 10, grave 13.

My Direct Barber Ancestors

#30 – Franklin Elisha Barber (1836-1917) – 2nd Great Grandfather.
#15 – Ida Mae Barber (1875-1953) – Great grandmother.
# 7 – Madonna Mae Montran (1893-1976) – Grandmother.
# 3 – My mother.
# 1 – Me.

My known relatives.


My records have 31 direct-line descendants identified over eight generations, which is less than 1% of my known Brown/Montran family tree. 

Endnotes

[i] Ancestry.Com – Barber Family History – http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=Barber
[ii] Forebears – Surname Meaning & Statistics, Internet website – http://forebears.io/surnames/barber | accessed 3 Apr 2016.
[iii] 1900 Census – Frank Barber – Inmate, Soldier’s Home, ED 148, Sheet 4A.
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It is all the rage – Birthplace Charts

It has become all the rage. Doing a birthplace chart.  I understand that J. Paul Hawthorne started the idea on Facebook of doing a simple pedigree chart indicating where your ancestors came from.  It has been picked up by many others, including Judy Russell, in her blog, The Legal Genealogist.  It was also suggested in Randy Seaver’s Genea-Musings  blog, so I just had to jump on the bandwagon and give it a try.
Don’s Birthplace Chart

There are several templates available, both Judy and Randy suggested one at on Google Drives.  I used it and filled in my entries with my own colors. 

My Birthplace Chart

It is clear, Michigan (light blue), with seven ancestors, is the most common state where my ancestors were born.  Next most common was Illinois (brown), with five ancestors born there.
There is a little bit of the Western Movement showing up in my chart.  New York to Indiana, Ohio to Indiana, but more so, I think, a northern movement shows up with Tennessee to Illinois to Michigan and Kentucky and Michigan to North Dakota. The unknown birth location for my maternal, great-grandfather’s parents jumps out like a sore thumb.  Trying to figure out those ancestors names and birth places is high on my list of tasks for my Brown/Montran research.
Rather than just saying England, I added the flag to show the birthplace of my 2nd great grandmother, my only known immigrant ancestor in four generations. 
My wife’s Birthplace Chart

Then I got to thinking, I really couldn’t do one of these charts without doing one for my wife’s family. We went to Easter dinner yesterday at one of niece’s homes. We enjoyed conversation with several family members. Needles-to-say, at some point anytime there is a family get together somehow the conversation turns to genealogy.  Anyway, I just happened to bring a hard copy of my wife’s birthplace chart.  It would be identical for her brother, except for the place of birth. Her brother, “J,” loved the chart and took it with him. 

I have really enjoyed the Saturday Night Genealogy Fun activity. Thanks for sharing the idea. Both my wife’s and my Birthplace charts are interesting to look at; they provide a visual representation of family lines and allows me to see things and notice things I might not otherwise notice.  Thank you J. Paul Hawthorn for the idea and thanks to Judy Russell and Randy Seaver for promoting it to be “all the rage.”

–       Don Taylor

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William Henry Brown’s parents were not who most researchers indicate they were.

When a conflict arises regarding an individual’s parents, it is important for me to reset all my assumptions and start afresh. Such is the case with one my more frustrating areas of research, the Browns of Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan. In a previous post, Henry Brown (c. 1843-c. 1888), I mentioned was not convinced that the Henry Brown that married Marion Sanford was the child of Benjamin Brown as most researchers have found.
In my continuing Brown research, my next research subject was going to be William Henry Brown’s father.  I began researching Benjamin Brown. I did a thorough look at his facts and determined that although Benjamin Brown did have a son named Henry, this Henry could not be the Henry Brown who married Marion Sanford, had 11+ children (Including my great-grandfather, Arthur Durwood Brown), and located to Dakota Territory about 1883.
To recap, I am certain of the information regarding William Henry Brown back to the 1870 Census. I then found William Henry Brown in the 1860 and 1850 Censuses always in Saline, Michigan.   
Henry Brown, son of Barney & Mary C. Brown
Year
Location
Event
Est Birth Yr.
1885
Dakota Territory
1885 Census[i] – W. H. Brown with wife Marion, and 11 children (Including Arthur).
1843
1884
Dakota Territory
Youngest son, Edward, born in Dakota Territory.
1882
Saline, Michigan
Youngest daughter, Adia born in Michigan.
1880
Saline, Michigan
1880 Census[ii] – Henry Brown (Age 37) with wife Marian & 8 children including Arthur
1843
1870
Saline, Michigan
1870 Census[iii] – Henry Brown (Age 25) with wife Marion & 2 children including Arthur.
1845*
1860
Saline, Michigan
1860 Census[iv] – Henry W Brown, (Age 17) in the household of Daney & Mary C. Brown with three siblings including Myron O Brown.
1843
1850
Saline, Michigan
1850 Census[v] – William H Brown, (Age 8) in the household of Barney & Mary C Brown with 1 sibling, Myron O. Brown.
1842
1842
Saline, Michigan
Birth?
(* Red indicates an outlier.)
Although William Henry Brown usually went by Henry, 1885, 1860, and 1850 Censuses, taken together, indicate why I believe his name to be William Henry Brown.
As I mentioned, many researchers have Henry Brown the son of Benjamin Brown and Eliza Fowler as the Henry who married Marion Sanford, etc. Following that Henry Brown, we see him in the 1850 and 1860 Census with Benj & Eliza, but in the 1870 Census, we find in living with William Brown (an apparent brother).
Henry Brown, Son of Benjamin & Eliza Fowler Brown
Year
Location
Event
Est Birth Yr.
1842
Michigan
Birth?
1850
Vernon, Mich.
1850 Census[vi] – Henry Brown, (Age 7) in the household with Benj. & Eliza Brown. Including William Brown (Age 10)
1843
1860
Vernon, Mich.
1860 Census[vii] – Henry Brown, (Age 16) in the household with Benjamin & Eliza Brown.
1844
1870
Vernon, Mich.
1870 Census[viii] – Henry Brown, (Age 28) living with William Brown (age 30)
1842
Clearly the [William] Henry Brown, who married Marion Sanford, and was the father of Arthur Durwood Brown, cannot be the same person as Henry Brown of Vernon.
I was pretty sure I needed to make this correction two years ago when I last looked at William Henry Brown’s life. Now, after reanalyzing the information I am certain.
In my research and records, I have corrected William Henry Brown’s parents to be Barney (Daney) and Mary C. Brown. I’ve also corrected my Brown/Montran Tree on Ancestry.com appropriately.

ENDNOTES

[i] 1885 Census Index – Dakota Territory; W. H. Brown – Census Records: page 44-018; NDSU Archives; http://library.ndsu.edu/db/census/family?ed=44-018-09.
[ii] 1880 Census; Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, ED 237, Page 21, Line 50; Ancestry.com.
[iii] 1870 Census; Henry Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Page 17, Line 18, Family 115; Ancestry.com.
[iv] 1860 Census; Daney (Barney) Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Line 34, Family 643; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDZ-DLM.
[v] 1850 Census; Barney Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, citing family 185; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8P-F8S.
[vi] 1850 Census; Benjamin Brown – Michigan, Shiawassee, Vernon, (Image 14 of 16) Lines 29-38; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8G-92K.
[vii] 1860 Census; Benjamin Brown – Michigan, Shiawassee, Vernon Township, Page 55, Line 11; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDR-XSL.
[viii] 1870 Census; Ancestry.com.;  Census Place: Vernon, Shiawassee, Michigan; Roll: M593_704; Page: 459A; Image: 512; Family History Library Film: 552203
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