Schools I’ve Attended

Those Places Thursday
My History

By Don Taylor

I often see articles and blogs that remind readers to write about their own life. Something that several suggest is to write about schools that you have attended. Most people have a few schools, but I have 15 schools that I have attended.  It is more of a book rather than an article or two. Looking back, I have attended seven elementary schools, one junior high school, three high schools, and four colleges. So, I thought I’d examine the school’s history and see what I can remember of my attending.

  • 1955 – Scheffer Elementary[1], St. Paul, MN– Kindergarten.
  • 1956 – Emerson Elementary, Minneapolis, MN – 1st grade.
  • 1957 – Cambridge Elementary, Cambridge, MN – 2nd grade.
  • 1957 – Franklin Elementary, Anoka, MN – 2nd grade.
  • 1958 – Parkview Elementary, Fridley, MN – 3rd, 4th, & 5th grades.
  • 1960 – Spring Lake Park Elementary, Spring Lake Park, MN – 5th & 6th grades.
  • 1961 – Elizabeth Hall Elementary, Minneapolis, MN 6th grade.
  • 1962 – Jordan Junior High School, Minneapolis, MN 7th, 8th, & 9th grades.
  • 1965 – Osse0 High, Osseo, MN – 10th, 11th, & 12th grades.
  1. 1966 – Billings Senior High, Billings, MT – part of 10th grade.[2]
  2. 1967 – Mumford High, Detroit, MI – part of 11th grade?
  • 1968 – Graduated from Osseo High School

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  • 1974 – Chapman University, Orange, California (Navy PACE)
  • 1976 – Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii (Navy PACE)
  • 1981 – Anoka Ramsey Community College, Coon Rapids, MN
  • 1984 – Metropolitan State University, St. Paul, MN

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For each of the schools I attended, I plan to look at the school’s history and see what memories I can jog loose about me and my attending that school.  My guess is that most of the elementary schools that I attended are now gone.

————- Disclaimer ————-

 

ENDNOTES

[1] If you had asked me before, I would have said I attended Schaeffer Elementary. Researching for this article I learned it was Scheffer Elementary. I double checked my DD Form 398 – Statement of Personal History. I indicated Schaeffer on mine when I completed it in 1968. Also, the form only included spaces for five schools; I had to continue on another page.

[2] I will need to look closer at this school.  For some reason. I think I went to Central High in Billings but a quick Internet search indicated that would be a Catholic school.  I am sure I attended a public school when living in Billings.

Fifth Grade Memories

[Last fall, Randy Seaver of Genea-Musings suggested thinking about your fifth grade memories. The time is often a pivotal point in a person’s life. I was speaking with my friend Aauriane about her fifth grade experiences and suggested she write about it.  Here are some of her memories.]

Fifth Grade Memories

By Aauriane Veleda

Guest Blogger

Fifth grade was a year of new beginnings and explorations for me. Fourth grade had introduced me to the concept of men being teachers and I loved Mr. Kruger dearly but he left us mid-course of the year for health reasons. Soon fifth grade followed and not only did we begin changing rooms for subjects this year, but I had three male instructors! This year we had three subjects – math, English and everything else was in home room. Mr. Long was my homeroom teacher but he also taught me science and history. I was one of those kids who loved to learn and for Christmas I asked for microscopes and biology sets – things you used to be able to get through Sears catalogs. Mr. Long fostered that learning and let me bring my biology set to school. He taught me dissection before and after school. I fell in love with science even more and thanks to Mr. Long’s love of history and artistic expression, I was learning about the American Revolution through drawing and coloring maps, costumes, uniforms and books. It was when I decided I loved to learn even more! Mr. Locke was my math teacher. He was ok, but I decided I did not like math, much less fractions. However, he got me started in math to the point I did it well, even though, I still don’t like it today. Mr. McLaughlin was my English teacher – with a thick Irish accent. I don’t remember much about him or that year. I remember Mr. Long the most. I still appreciate all he did for me and he didn’t have to – he loved to teach and went above and beyond for those who wanted to learn.
            The fifth grade brought another first – a boyfriend. Up to this point, boys were boys and some were friends. We had a huge sand pit outside our classroom door and a few of us went there early, on dry mornings, where we would have long jump competitions before class rooms were opened. I wasn’t always the farthest but I did win a few and I was the only girl willing to get dirty and have fun and match the guys. During this time one boy – Kenneth O’Brian – decided he liked me and I liked him because he was sweet and brave – he wasn’t afraid to talk to me. And he wanted to hold my hand. He was my first boyfriend, and officially so, because he asked if he could be. I received my first kiss from him. He wasn’t anything extraordinary, in fact he was a bit heavy set with freckles and red curly hair. His kisses were wet and sloppy, but quick. I told my mom he was my boyfriend and she giggled. Then she had to meet his mom. But we were taken to each others house to visit and be boyfriend/girlfriend. Nothing more than an occasional kiss and hand holding ever occurred, but lots of affection and gifts. He made it known I was his girl and he defended me. I thought this was a new and neat concept I had never considered in a guy before. He started me on the path of understanding relationships. At the end of our fifth grade summer, right before sixth grade, Kenny had to move. I never saw or heard from him again. I wonder how he turned out?
            The only other things I remember from this year is a baby sister, lots of carnivals and fairs as mom was on the committee for events and a sack race and three-legged race on May Day events the school held for us and we all got to go outside and have fun. I don’t think they do these anymore. I learned to be on time and walk between classrooms as our middle school was all portables and multi-storied buildings and we had to find out way. My fifth grade was preparing us for the bigger schools to come. Our classes were in the very back and furthest portables so we walked the furthest, but we were also made to be aware we were the big kids on campus and we had to watch out for and help the smaller kids. This made us feel large and in charge. I didn’t realize how much I remembered of 5th grade but it was a good year!
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Television in my family

Television in my family

Old Philips television set We did not have a television while I was growing up. I remember listening to the radio a lot when I was young. When I was in the second grade (1957), we lived in upstairs of a bakery in downtown Anoka, Minnesota. Next-door was a bar (beer joint) that had a television. Actually, they had one of the earliest color televisions. I remember my grandmother, Donna, taking me there to watch special events. I specifically remember watching the Tournament of Roses Parade and the Rose Bowl in color there. It was amazing.

We did not have our own television until I was in the fifth grade (about 1960) and were living in Spring Lake Park, Minnesota. It was a black and white TV. I remember watching morning cartoons a lot and my favorite TV show at the time was “Have Gun Will Travel.” At the time, I thought Richard Boone and my grandfather, Dick, look a lot alike. I think they had the same kind of mustache.

In 1961, my mother married Budgar and in 1962 we moved to North Minneapolis (1502 Fremont Ave No.). While there, Budgar purchased a color television. “Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color” and “Route 66” were my favorite television programs then (although I still loved “Have Gun Will Travel” but it was only in black and white). It was the first television I recall having a remote. I could change channels by clicking my cap gun (with a Paladin holster) – I guess TV remote was ultrasonic and the clicks of my cap gun made the TV change channels.

RCA Indian Head test pattern
RCA Indian Head test pattern

About 1965, we, my mother, younger sister, and I, lived in Detroit for a short time. In Detroit, we had a weird television. Rather than the standard clicking channels, the TV had continuously tuning through the VHS band much like UHF channel selector did in those days. Between channels six and seven there were a multitude of things that could be received. FM radio stations were there along with amateur radio and some, as I recall, police/fire radio communications. It was a cool television and the only one I’ve ever seen with that type of tuner in the VHF band.

Television notes from other family members via Facebook:

My sister Glennis says: “We got our 1st TV when I was 7… an RCA Victor. For many years we only had one channel, our own local channel 4 (then an NBC affiliate.) a second channel came in a few years later when they built a repeater for the Eugene ABC affiliate. Our second TV was also Black and White. We got a Magnavox color TV when I was a senior in high school. By then, we had three channels.”

Aunt Barbara says: “I think we got our first black and white TV in about 1949/1950. It was a gift from my Uncle Bob. We loved it and him too.”

My nephew Luke says, “We had a TV already when I came along. My first memory of television was color, a little 12″ or so screen with green backlit pushbuttons down the side of the screen for channel selection and a roller wheel for volume control. It was undoubtedly a Sony. We had it in Roseburg Oregon and I remember only two channels. My mother (Glennis) had a black and white TV after the divorce, a yellow plastic housed unit with a tiny little knob on the bottom right for on/off and volume control. This was in Eugene, I remember at least three channels.”