William Hunt Scott (1834-1903)

Ancestor Sketch
Roberts-Scott Line
By Don Taylor

Roberts Research 2019 – Ancestor #36

List of Grandparents

  1. – Grandfather: Bert Allen Roberts (1903-1949)
  2. – 1st Great-grandmother: Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams (1883-1945)
  3. – 2nd Great-grandfather: Samuel Vaden Scott(1862-1931) & More
  4. – 3rd Great-grandfather: William Hunter Scott (c. 1834-1903)
  5. – 4th Great-grandfather: Samuel Kinkade Scott (1809-?)[1]
  6. – 5th Great-Grandfather: John Scott (1784-1856)
  7. – 6th Great-Grandfather: William Jarvis Scott (? – ?)
  8. – 7th Great-Grandfather: James Scott (1719-1783)

William Hunt Scott (c.1834-1903)

Birth

William Hunt Scott was born in Turkey Hill, St. Clair County Illinois about 1834. His father, John Scott, came to Illinois with his father in s1797 and along with five brothers and one brother-in-law established the “Turkey Hill” colony in present-day St. Clair County. This was the first American settlement in the county.

In other news of the times, The Black Hawk War had ended only two years before his birth. John Reynolds resigned as Governor of Illinois to become a Representative to the US Congress. William Lee Ewing took his place as governor for about three weeks until newly elected Joseph Duncan became the sixth governor of Illinois, and the first, and only, Whig to that office.

Childhood

William grew up as the oldest of six children.  His five siblings included:

Name Born
Sarah 1836
Mary 1839
Francis/Franklin 1840
Emily 1845
Rachel 1849

All were born in St. Clair County.

The 1840 Census indicates the Samuel Scott family of St Clair, Illinois consists of himself, apparently his wife and three children including William. The other two are presumed to be Sarah and Mary.

The 1850 Census indicates the Samuel K Scott family of Turkey Hill, St. Clair, Illinois consists of Samuel, apparently his wife and six children. The 16-year-old William is farming, and four of his younger siblings (Sarah, Mary, Francis, and Emily) are attending school.

Marriage to Emily Hendricks.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860 (probably between 1850 and 1856), William located to Washington County, Illinois.

There, in 1856, when he was about 22 years old, William married Emily Maples Hendricks.

They had four children together.

Name Born Location
Viola 1860 Washington Co.
Samuel Vaden 1863 Washington Co.
Francis Perry 1870 St. Clair Co.
William Alonzo 1871 St. Clair Co.

Adult

The 1860 Census indicates they lived in Township 3S, Range 4W. Today that township is now known as Elkton Township. The towns of Elkton and Oakdale (Ayers Point Post Office) lie within it. Both are about 5 miles southwest of Nashville, Illinois. The family consisted of William, Emily, and their oldest child, Viola. William was a farmer.

I have not found evidence, yet, regarding William and the Civil War. I would expect a 27-year-old of the time to have served. There are hundreds of “William Scott’s” who served in Illinois and determining if this William Scott served is a future project for me.

The 1870 Census showed the family back in St. Clair County and enumerated in Freeburg. The family consists of William, Emily, and three of the children, Viola, Sam, and 3-month-old Francis. William is working as a “Wagon Maker.” Viola and Sam are attending school.

On 27 October 1878 Emily died.  What happened to William after that is mostly unknown. Samuel married Amanda Jane Haley in May 1879. Viola married Charles Monroe Kansas Galloway two months later, in July 1879. I have been unsuccessful finding William in the 1880 Census. It appears that the other children may have been scattered as I’ve been unable to find them either.

Marriage to Matilda T (Cooper) Elkins

Several researchers indicate that William Hunt Scott married Matilda T. Elkins (nee Cooper) on Dec 16, 1885, in Franklin County, IL. That seems likely, but I haven’t found compelling evidence that the William Scott that married Matilda was this William Scott.

I’ve been unable to find William or Matilda in the 1900 Census.

Death & Burial

Finally, some researchers indicate that William H Scott died 13 May 1903 in Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri. Again, I’ve been unable to verify that this William H Scott is my William Hunt Scott. There is a William Scott buried at the Glenda Cemetery, buried at Glenda Cemetery in Farmington. If you have evidence indicating this William Scott is the same one as above, I would love to hear from you.

Further Actions / Follow-up

  • Do a Family Study looking for William’s children post 1878.
  • Do a Family Study looking at William’s siblings.

————–  Disclaimer  ————–

 


 Sources

William Hunt Scott is person LYQC-SF4 on FamilySearch.

  • “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ­5WZ : 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644.
  • “United States Census, 1850,” Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360
  • “United States Census, 1860,” Census Place: Township 3 S Range 4 W, Washington, Illinois; Roll: M653_235; Page: 942; Family History Library Film: 803235
  • “United States Census, 1870,”
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M6WN­2W2 : 17 October 2014), Sam Scott in household of Willin Scott, Illinois, United States; citing p. 18, family 122, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,778.
  • Chris H. Baily, The Jehu Scott Family (Eustis, FL, Chris H. Baily), Files (Personal), Person 10 – William Hunt Scott. Bailey, Chris, “The Jehu Scott Family” dated 7/16/16.
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 27 January 2019), memorial page for William H. Scott (unknown–13 May 1903), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13568645, citing Glenda Cemetery, Farmington, St. Francois County, Missouri, USA; Maintained by Clara & Terry L. Luster, Sr. (contributor 46485785) .
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-85D : 3 March 2016), Samuel V. Scott and Amanda J. Haley, 24 May 1879; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.
  • “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFKW-26N : 5 November 2017), Patience Marshall in an entry for Francis P. Scott and Florence E. Roberts, 24 Mar 1901; citing Franklin, Illinois, United States, county offices, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,307.

Endnotes

[1] I have not independantly confirmed the ancestors of Samuel Kinkade. I am, however, confident that Samuel was William Hunt Scott’s father.

The Scotts of St. Clair County, Illinois – 1840 Census

Census Sunday
Roberts-Scott

William Hunt Scott, my 3rd great-grandfather, was born about 1834 in St. Clair County, Illinois. I followed him back from his being the head of the household to the 1850 Census and living in the household of his father Samuel Kinkade Scott at Turkey Hill, St. Clair County.[i] The 1850 household looked like:

  • Samuel K Scott 41     Farmer – Real Estate Value 1600
  • Elizabeth Scott 30     Keeping House
  • William H Scott 16     Farming
  • Sarah Scott         14    Attending School
  • Mary Scott          11     Attending School
  • Francis P Scott  10     Attending School
  • Emily Scott          5      Attending School
  • Rachel Scott        1

This household has every appearance of being a traditional home with husband, wife, and six children. I hoped I could continue back to the 1840 Census. Would the Samuel Scott family include all the children and fit the model of a traditional family or might there be some other individuals in the household.

The 1840 Census[ii]

Samuel K Scott – St Clair, Illinois

MALES   |   FEMALES

– 1 – – – 1 |   2 – – – 1 –

MALES

  • 5-10         1      Presumed to be William Hunter (Born 1830-1835)
  • 30-40      1      Clearly the Head of Household – Samuel K Scott (Born 1800-1810)

FEMALES

  • < 5            2       Presumed to be Sarah and Mary – (Both born 1835-1840)
  • 20-30      1      Presumed to be Elizabeth (Born 1810-1820)

All entries are consistent with the 1850 Census.

Conclusion

William Hunt Scott and his two oldest sisters are clearly enumerated in the 1840 Census. William won’t be in the 1830 Census and his father, Samuel was only 21 years old in 1830, very possibly in the household of his father, John Scott. I am looking forward to researching this family line back to the revolution.


ENDNOTES

[i] 1850 Census (NARA), 1850 – Samuel K Scott. Year: 1850; Census Place: Turkey Hill, St Clair, Illinois; Roll: M432_126; Page: 359A; Image: 360. https://search.ancestry.com/collections/8054/records/16536816/.

[ii] 1840 Census (NARA), 1840 Census – Samuel Scott – St Clair, Illinois. “United States Census, 1840,” database with images, FamilySearch accessed: 15 August 2017), Samuel Scott, St Clair, Illinois, United States; citing p. 280, NARA microfilm publication M704, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 70; FHL microfilm 7,644. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHBJ-5WZ

Barnes – Surname Saturday

Roberts-Barnes
Surname Saturday

Barnes Name Origin & Meaning

Until we discover an immigrant Barnes ancestor, how the name was derived and its meaning is still elusive. If it is English, it probably relates to someone who lived by or worked at a barn. However, I could also come from “Barnes,” which is on the Thames in London. Likewise, it could refer to the son or the servant of a barne.

If the name derives from Old Norse or Irish the potential meanings are entirely different – ‘young warrior,’ ‘descendant of Bearán’ or possibly ‘spear.’

Once we discover the immigrant ancestor, we will have a better idea of the meaning of the surname in our case.

Geographical

Map showing location of St. Barthélémy.
Map showing St. Barthélémy by I. Hanhil.

Worldwide there are approximately 414,310 people who bear the Barnes surname.

It is most prevalent in the United States where over half of the people with the Barnes surname live. In little Saint-Barthélemy,  in the Caribbean, it is the 27th most common surname with one in 189 people with the surname of Barnes.

My Earliest Barnes Ancestors

I don’t know where or when my third great-grandfather, Joel Barnes, was born. However, my second great-grandfather, Nelson Barnes, was born in 1816, in Broome, Schoharie County, New York. This is in keeping with Barnes migration patterns. In 1840, 19% of the Barnes families in the United States lived in New York. About 1845 Nelson Barnes headed west to Indiana to settle the land there. Nelson had seven children born in Indiana before his death in 1884.

My great-grandfather, Joel Clinton Barnes, had 11 children, all born in Sullivan County, Indiana. I have not traced my Barnes family to any living male Barnes, yet. That said, Joel Clinton Barnes only had one son, Raye Barnes, who lived to adulthood. So, if you know a descendant of Raye, I would love to hear from you.

Joel Clinton Barnes had three brothers that lived to adulthood:

  • Theodore E. Barnes (1847-1919)
  • Abraham Barnes (1852-1921)
  • Cyrus John Barnes (1855-1879)

Any of their male descendants would also carry Nelson Barnes’ Y-DNA.

My Direct Barnes Ancestors

5.    Grandmother: Essie Pansy Barnes (1903-1982) – Family Search
10.  Great-grandfather: Joel Clinton Barnes(1857-1921) – Family Search
20.  2nd Great-grandfather: Nelson Barnes (1816-1884) – Family Search
40.  3rd Great-grandfather: Joel Barnes (____-____) – Family Search[i]

Joel Barnes Descendants

My records include 30 individuals with the Barnes surname and 177 direct-line descendants of Joel Barnes (the elder).

Sources:

Endnotes:


[i] Although Family Search indicates a birthdate and birthplace for Joel Barnes (the elder), I have not confirmed that information, so I am not using it here.

Jane (Lawson) Marshall (1820-____)

Roberts/Marshall/Lawson

My 3rd great grandmother, Jane Lawson, is one of my most frustrating research subjects – almost a brick wall. She just vanishes in my research.  She was born about 1820 in Tennessee. She probably married a man surnamed Marshall about 1842, because she had her only known child, Patience Anna Marshall, on 30 Dec 1843.

Her husband either died or vanished before 1849. The 1850 Census shows the 30-year-old Jane living with her younger brother Thomas, in Jefferson County, Illinois along with Thomas’ new wife and Jane’s daughter Patience. And there are no Marshalls in the mortality schedule identified in the 1850 Census for Jefferson or surrounding counties.

One researcher suggests that Jane may have married Farris Presley in Marion County, Illinois, in 1864, but I have been unable to confirm that.

In my research, I was able to place her as likely in the household of Jacob Lawson during the 1840 Census. (The census only provides names of heads of households.)

So, I’ve discovered woefully little about Jane and her life. I’ve followed her brother Thomas having 10 children and living Jefferson County all of his life. I’ve discovered her mother’s name was Patience, presumably who she named her daughter for.

Jane Lawson

  • Circa 1820 – Born
  • Circa 1842 – Married? (Unk Marshall)
  • 30 Dec 1843 – Gave birth to Patience.
  • 1 June 1850 – Lived with brother, Thomas

Jane’s Parents – Jacob and Patience Lawson

In the 1850 Census, her parents and (apparent) siblings are listed only as being in Jefferson County, Illinois, but the 1860 Census add a key fact, the family lived in Township 2S of Range 4E. Whenever I see a person living in the Midwest, I always check the Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office Records. There, I searched for the surname Lawson in Jefferson County Illinois.  There were six, and one of them was Jacob Lawson, in Township 2S, of Range 4E. He received bounty land.

Pursuant to an act of Congress on 28 September 1850, Jacob Lawson, private in Captain Waterhouse’s Company, Tennessee Volunteers – Florida ???? received 80 acres on 2 January 1854. It was the North Half of the South-East Quarter of section thirty-four. A quick review found the land about two miles south of Bluford and about two miles north of Interstate 64. (About 10 miles east of Mount Vernon and 90 miles east of Saint Louis.)

Painting of the Battle of New Orleans by Edward Percy Moran.
Battle of New Orleans by Edward Percy Moran

This new knowledge gives me a new direction and new hope for further research. What might I find about Jane when I research her other siblings? What Newspapers did Mount Vernon publish during her and her parent’s lives?  I also know that her father served honorably in the War of 1812. Jacob is the first of my ancestors for whom I learned served during the war of 1812. The Tennessee Volunteers are one of the key units during the War of 1812. I wonder what my 4th Great-Grandfather did in the war. It should be interesting to research that.

Ancestor Sketch – FNU Marshall (c. 1816 – c. 1846)

Roberts/Marshall Line

By Don Taylor

The father of Patience Anna (Marshall) Dean Roberts continues to elude me.  I’ve never heard of a wall growing, but the brick wall regarding Patience’s father seems to become more and more solid. I know virtually nothing about him.

Patience was born on 30 Dec 1843, so we can assume his father was alive in March 1843 in order to father Patience.

Patience and her mother are living with Jane’s brother in the 1850 Census. Additionally, a search for anyone with surname Marshall in Jefferson County, Illinois in the 1850 Mortality Schedule, yielded no one with the Marshall surname listed for Jefferson County or the surrounding counties.  This leads me to believe that Patience’s father died before 1 June 1849.

1850 Census showing Thomas Lawson with Jane & Patience Marshall.

Jane (Lawson) Marshall was about 22 years old when she conceived Patience, so, I’m guessing that her husband was at least 18 and probably under 32 when they were married. That suggests a birthdate somewhere between 1810 and 1822.

Even though the 1850 Census indicates that Patience was born in Tennessee, all other records indicate she was born in Illinois. I believe the Tennessee entry is in error. Patience’s mother was born in Tennessee and Jane’s younger brother Thomas was born in Illinois in 1829, suggesting the Lawson’s moved to Illinois before that. Additionally, it appears that Jane’s father is Jacob Lawson and Jacob appears in the 1840 Census as a family head of household. That suggests Jane lived in Illinois prior to meeting and marrying Patience’s father.

With this in mind, I speculate, Patience’s father was:

  • Born: 1810-1822 – Probably Tennessee.
  • Marr: 1842-1843 – Probably Illinois – Probably Jackson County.
  • Died: 1843-1949 – Probably Illinois – Probably Jackson County.

Research Roberts-Marshall 2018 – Ancestor #34

List of Grandparents

Newspapers are often a great source for death information. Chronicling America indicates 3 newspapers have been published in Jefferson County, Illinois. The earliest is the Sentinel beginning in 1856. Likewise, Find-a-Grave is an excellent source for death information and clues; There are no entries for anyone with the surname Marshall before 1864.

I’ve also looked closely at The History of Jefferson County, Illinois by William Henry Perrin (1883) and have found nothing relating to the Marshalls of interest in that book.


Further Actions / Follow-up

  • The 1840 Census indicates no families with the Marshall surname in Jefferson County.
  • The 1850 Census indicates there were only two households containing individuals with the Marshall surname. First, Jane and Patience were living with Jane’s brother. Second, was a family consisting of seven individuals, apparently Gabriel Marshall, age 45 from Tennessee, his wife, Frances, and five (apparent) children. Based upon the birthplaces of his children, it appears they came to Illinois between 1834 and 1838. This is about the time that Patience’s father may have come to Illinois as well. As such, my next effort with the Marshalls is to attempt to find Gabriel Marshall family and see if Gabriel had a brother that would fit as Patience’s father.
  • A visit to the Jefferson County Historical Society may help find additional resources.