Genealogical Education – RootsTech

High on my list of things to do is to spend a least one hour a week improving my genealogical knowledge through regular webinars, seminars, and workshops. One of the easiest and best ways for me to keep up with this is to watch RootsTech presentations. RootsTech is arguably the best Genealogical Conference there is and their presenters are top notch. I would really like to go sometime but Salt Lake City is difficult for me to get to, especially in February and March. Maybe next year. In the meantime, many of last year’s presentations are available to watch for free on the RootTech website.

RootsTech speaker Devin Ashby.

I use FamilySearch.org nearly daily, so I skipped over a presentation by Devin Ashby, “FamilySearch.org – 10 Easy Tricks” a couple of times thinking it would be a little too basic for my needs. Wow, I was so wrong. I was familiar with getting an account, using the search features, and understand the shared family tree, but I hadn’t paid much attention to the Memories section and how easy it is to post material, particularly photos, to FamilySearch. I also learned that the indexing process had changed significantly since I last did it several years ago.

The presentation got me to thinking. I’ve been concerned that much of my genealogical work will be lost when I pass and my blog ceases to be. I know much of it will be available in the “WayBack” machine for years, but it would be better to have much of my research in a permanent location. I know that Family Search is serious about genealogy and will never go away (like a company can).  As such, I’ve decided to make FamilySearch a repository for my research. As I continue with my research, I will post stories to my blog as always, but I will also post an abbreviated version of my stories to FamilySearch. Along with the story, I will post any photos that I own or are out of copyright associated with the story. I think this will be an excellent way to help my research find a permanent archival home.

I have also created a task to bring some of my past stories to Family Search as well. I know the stories are in my trees on Ancestry, but I’ve had enough trouble with tree synchronization that I’m not going to rely on Ancestry any longer. I currently have two trees that won’t synchronize and am just frustrated with the process.

I recommend, if you haven’t seen it, to watch the Devin Ashby’s presentation. Learn more about the features FamilySearch has that can enhance your trees and make your archive capabilities better, faster, and cheaper.  And try, like I do, taking an hour a week for genealogical training and education.

Keep on learning,
Don Taylor

 

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