MGS had a winning Spring Workshop.

I attended the Maine Genealogical Society (MGS) DNA Workshop last weekend. I was impressed with the conference organization and agenda.

The logistics were excellent. Registration was easy; the conference program booklet was done well with a few extra blank pages for notes. I don’t know how many people were there, but I’d guess a couple hundred. The venue, The Augusta Elks Club, was adequate for the event, and the food was good. The MGS bookstore people were there. If you have ancestors from Maine, the MGS Bookstore probably has a book or two that can augment your research. Also, the Maine Historical Society had folks there promoting the society.

However, the real reason for my attending was to see Blaine Bettinger (@Blaine_5) speak. I had never seen Blaine before, but I have used several of his genetic genealogy charts for years. Because I have respected his work for several years, I was excited to meet him in person and hear him speak. I was not disappointed. Blaine was energetic all day and kept the audience engaged and interested. As the day progressed on his topics got more and more advanced.

His first topic was “Introduction to DNA for Genealogists” and he explained the types of chromosomes (X, Y, Mitochondrial, and autosomal) and the tests for each of them. He also went through inheritance and what each of the tests might show you.

Mitochondrial DNA
Picture : by Emmanuel Douzery
[CC BY-SA 4.0]via Wikimedia Commons

His second session was “Using mtDNA and Y-DNA to Explore Your Genealogy.” He explained Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), what HVR1 & HVR2 tests are about and what a full genome test is. He also provided information about how mtDNA test results may be used to solve family mysteries. Then he moved on to Y-DNA testing. He described STR (short tandem repeat) testing versus SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms) testing. I understand the STR explanations fairly well, but I got lost in the SNP stuff, again. I’ve listened to other people speak about SNPs, I didn’t understand them either. One of these days, I’ll get it.

Again, he spoke about using the test results to solve family mysteries. As you may know from reading my blog, in my case, I was able to use Y-DNA results to be certain that “Roberts” surnamed individuals were on my paternal line. See: My Paternal Brick Wall and Finding Family … tools to determine my biological father and half-siblings for details.

After lunch, Blaine continued with “Using Autosomal DNA to Solve Family Mysteries.” Besides the basics of what Autosomal DNA is, he reminded us that we have two family trees. A Genealogical Family Tree and a Genetic Family Tree. The chance of matching a first or second cousin is really high (over 99%), but the chance of matching a fifth cousin might be as low as 10%. That is to say that only one in ten of your fifth cousins may hold a DNA string that you also inherited. That is understandable, on average a 5th cousin would match only 3.32cM or .0488% of a match.
(See http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_statistics for details.)

Blaine Bettinger
Photo used by permission

Blaine’s 4th talk of the day was about “Using Third-Party Tools to Analyze your DNA.” This talk was an intermediate session with a close look at some of GEDMatch’s tools. Besides looking at the various matches available, but also looked at phasing and a tool he runs on everyone he imports into GEDMatch, the “Are Your Parents Related” tool, which answers questions regarding homozygosity that can skew your other results. He also talked about Lazarus and triangulation tools that GEDMatch has.

Although Blaine took questions throughout his presentations regarding issues at that point, he also had a more formal Question and Answers session at the end of the conference using Q&A cards written during the conference.

I thoroughly enjoyed the conference. I thought Blaine Bettinger was a great speaker. He kept to the topics. His slides were legible and decipherable from across the room. I would go out of my way to attend future conferences where he is a speaker.

To learn more about Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D., see his Genetic Genealogist website. His website includes a biography page, a presentations page, and a “Contact Me” page. I’m sure you will enjoy having him as a speaker for your conference and your attendees will learn a lot.

On May 21st, I’ll be going to the “Third Annual Southern Maine Genealogy Conference” sponsored by the Greater Portland Chapter (GPC) of the Maine Genealogical Society. This conference will be in Portland, ME, (much closer to me) and will feature D. Joshua Taylor of Who Do You Think You Are? fame (no known relationship). Another fantastic day of genealogical programming is scheduled. I’m looking forward to listening to him talk. You can register for this conference on the GPC-MGS website.

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Search Military Records - Fold3 Search Military Records - Fold3

Newspaper Research Day – 12 new venues for Donna Montran and “Chin Chin”

Newspaper Research Day

Today was a Newspaper research day.  I utilized three of my favorite newspaper sites looking for places that the show “Chin Chin” was playing during April and May of 1920. “Chin Chin” has funny search results depending on how and where you search.  I have found that instead of searching for Donna Montran and “Chin Chin,” it is better to search for Chin “Roy Binder” or Chin “Walter Wills.” Binder and Wills were the stars of the roadshow and are named in almost every article regarding the show. 

Elephind

Elephind is a free site.  It searches the Chronicling America (US Library of Congress) as well as several other newspaper sources including the California Digital Newspaper Collection, and Illinois Digital Newspaper Collections.  The advanced search doesn’t give many additional search options, just years, countries, and sources. In my case, I sought only records in the United States and during the year, 1920.  
Elephind makes downloading a searchable PDF very easy. First, click on the article page.  Then I highlight the page information, for example, I highlighted the following:   The Bennington evening banner., May 13, 1920, Page PAGE TWO, Image 2.  Then click on PDF and then the download icon. When it presents the file name, I replace it with my copied title.  The metadata for the downloaded file indicates where the it came from. So between the filename and the metadata I have all of my source information.

Newspapers.Com

newspapers.com
Next, I went to Newspapers..com. Their search methodology is straightforward. It is easy to narrow the date to a particular month, in my case I searched from Apr 1 to May 30, 1920.  Once Newspapers.Com identifies your matches, it is very easy to review the option then print/save the article as either a clipping or as a full page. The good news is that if you select “Save as PDF” it auto-documents the source information for the page. The bad news is that the article is an image within the PDF and is not searchable.  It is like a JPG embedded in the PDF. 

Newspaper Archives via MyHeritage

Next, I searched Newspaper Archives. I had a subscription to Newspaper Archives a few year ago and liked it. Now my subscription is through MyHeritage where my Data Subscription allows access to Newspaper Archives.  The good news is that searching Newspaper Archives within MyHeritage resulted in many more matches than either Elephind or Newspapers.com produced. The bad news is that the date filters, even when set to “Match Exactly” don’t work. So, my search for “Chin AND Binder AND Wills” during April 1920, yielded 787,764 results.  Admittedly, the first six matches were all articles I was looking for, however, after that the matches began to be from other months within 1920.
I did run into a problem using Newspaper Archives via MyHeritage.  I often would find a match and then click on the article to see the detail, then not be presented with an option to display the actual page.  I could not view the page nor download it.  I sent their customer support an inquiry and provided them a screen shot of what I was seeing.
Upon drilling in and verifying the information was what I was looking for, sometimes the files downloaded fine, sometimes the file download errored. I was, however, able to download all the files I could zoom into and review. Like the technique I used on Elephind, I’d copy the newspaper title, examine the article, confirming it was an article I am interested in; then I’d download the file using the Document information I copied moments before.  The files downloaded are PDF files and are fully searchable.

Genealogy Bank

I used to have a subscription with Genealogy Bank.  I liked them, but I found I just couldn’t afford three premium newspaper services. Once one of my other premium newspaper services expires, I won’t renew with them and will go back to Genealogy Bank.  My plan is to continue with two premium newspaper subscriptions at a time.   

12 New Venues for “Chin Chin”

Between the three sources, I found articles indicating that “Chin Chin” played on the following dates at the following cities:

1920-04-05 – Sandusky, OH
1920-04-06 – Lima, OH
1920-04-09 – Steubenville, OH
1920-04-10 – New Philadelphia, OH
1920-04-11 – Coshocton, OH
1920-04-20 – Cumberland, MD
1920-04-22 – Frederick, MD
1920-05-04 – Wilkes Barre, PA
1920-05-13 – Bennington, VT
1920-05-18 – Oneonta, NY
1920-05-19 – Mt. Carmel, PA
1920-05-31 – Bridgeport, CT

The research didn’t fill out April and May 1920, in its entirety, but adding a dozen new places for Donna Montran’s career is a good day of research. Now I just need more time to research the particular venues.
– Don Taylor
———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Bio – Barney Brown (c. 1813-c 1865)

Brown

By – Don Taylor

Barney/Daney Brown is my third great-grandfather on my mother’s paternal line. I have not found much Barney or his life. In fact, I have only found him in two census records, which is barely enough to prove even his existence. But, this is what I think I know.

c. 1813 – Born in New Hampshire.
c. 1840 – Married Mary C. (Unknown).
c. 1842 – Son, William Henry born in Michigan.
c. 1845 – Son, Myron O. born in Michigan.
    1850 – Lived near Seline, Washtenaw County, Michigan
c. 1852 – Daughter, Alice C. born in Michigan.
c. 1855 – Don, David V. born in Michigan.
    1860 – Lived near Seline, Washtenaw County, Michigan
c. 1865 – Died (Probably near Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan

Discussion

According to the 1850 and the 1860 Censuses, Barney was 36 and 46 years-old respectively which indicates he was born in 1813 or 1814. Both censuses show that he was born in New Hampshire. Several other researchers suggest that his father was Odell Brown, and his mother’s name was Jane, however, I have not managed to confirm those names. Also, some researchers indicate that he had a brother, David, who was born about 1810.

In the 1850 Census he is named Barney; in the 1860 Census, he is called Daney. This name change leads to some confusion, which is why I call him Barney/Daney. When I find additional documentation, I will correct the name as appropriate.

I know nothing of his childhood, other than he apparently had an older brother.

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney in the 1840 Census. It is likely he was living with his family in New Hampshire, Michigan, or somewhere in between. The 1840 Census only names the heads of households, so if Barney/Daney was living with his father or another person, the 26-year-old would not be listed.

He appears to have left New Hampshire and located in Michigan sometime before 1842 because his oldest son was born in Michigan.

He appears to have married Mary C. (Unknown) about 1840. This marriage is based solely on my knowing his oldest known son, William Henry Brown, being born in 1842. It is not clear if he married Mary C. before he located to Michigan after he settled in Saline, Michigan, or elsewhere.

Barney/Daney and Jane appear to have had four children.[1]

They are:

William Henry Brown (1842-?)
Myron O. Brown (1845-?)
Alice C. Brown (1852-?)
David V. Brown (1855)

In 1850, Barney was living with his wife, Mary, and two children, William Henry and Myron O. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan as a farmer[2].

In 1860, Barney was living with his wife, Mary, and four children, Henry W., Myron O., Alice C., and David V. Brown in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan as a farmer.[3] Living with the Browns was a Melvina Miller, age 17 who was a domestic and also attended school.[4]

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney in the 1870 Census. I did find his wife in the 1870 census living as a widow with Henry & Ann Davidson in Saline, Washtenaw County, Michigan. Because of that, I believe that Barney/Daney died sometime between 1860 and 1870.

I have been unsuccessful finding Barney’s burial location.

Further Actions:

Determine Barney/Daney’s preferred name, also the date and place of his birth.
Determine Barney/Daney’s date and place of death.
Determine Barney/Daney’s location during the 1820, 1830, and 1840 Censuses.
Follow the other children through the censuses.
Confirm that Odell and Jane Brown were his parents.
Determine Barney/Daney’s wife maiden name.

List of Greats

Arthur Durwood Brown
William Henry Brown
Barney/Daney Brown
Odell Brown?????

ENDNOTES

[1] The 1860 Census, Population Schedule, does not include family relationships. Consequently, identifying the relationships as parents/children from those records is speculative. William H and Myron O lived with Barney & Mary during the 1850 Census. “Henry W.” and the other children lived with Daney & Mary during the 1860 Census.
[2] 1850 Census; Barney Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MF8P-F8S
[3] 1860 Census; Daney (Barney) Brown – Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan; Family Search; Saline, Washtenaw, Michigan, Family 644; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDZ-DLM
[4] Ibid.
———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Search Military Records - Fold3 Search Military Records - Fold3

“In 1897 Nothing Happened…” ‘cept a Shipwreck

by Don Taylor

Sign "On this site in 1897 nothing happened" photo by Don Taylor
One of my wife’s nieces lives here in Scarborough. On her house, she has a sign which reads, “On This Site in 1897 Nothing Happened.” I know her home was built in the 1980s, as was most of her neighborhood, which is nestled between Pleasant Hill and Higgins Beach. When I first saw the sign, I thought, “well, maybe nothing happened on her property, but I’ll bet something happened in the area.”
Sure enough, on August 11, 1897, there was great excitement in Scarborough. During the day before, it was wicked foggy. One observer said it looked as if “the space between earth and sky was filled with gray-white cotton.”[i] During the night it just got worse. About two o’clock in the morning, there were loud crashes and curdling noises coming from the water. I’ll bet, they were loud enough you probably could hear them through the thick fog two miles away at my niece’s property. When the fog cleared in the morning, it was clear that a ship had run aground.  
Howard W. Middleton appeared very low in the
water while she was aground
Photo: Scarborough Historical Society
The Howard W. Middleton, a three-masted schooner had run aground on a ledge near Higgins Beach. It contained 894 tons of Pennsylvania coal headed for Portland. All the crew members made it safely to shore. Tug boats from Portland tried to get it off the rocks to no avail.[ii] Most of the cargo was saved, although it is said that some of the locals salvaged enough coal for themselves to last them through three winters.  
Photo of Howard W. Middleton Shipwreck by Rich Bard Photo.
Remnants of Howard W. Middleton shipwreck
 Photo by Rich Bard (CC BY-ND 2.0)
The following month a storm drove the wreck further inland onto Higgins Beach where some of the remains can be seen 119 years later during low tides.
It may be that nothing happened at my wife’s niece’s property in 1897, but certainly there was a lot of excitement in her neighborhood that year surrounding the sinking of the Howard W. Middleton.

ENDNOTES

[i] Internet: As told by Emma Bray David (December 1967) per The Full Wiki http://www.thefullwiki.org/Higgins_Beach#Howard_W._Middleton_Shipwreck
[ii] Internet: Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag; Maritime Tales: Shipyards and Shipwrecks; http://scarborough.mainememory.net/page/1533/display%3Fpage=2.html

———- DISCLAIMER ———-

Bio – Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams

Bio – Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams (1883-1945)

Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams
Photo from the Chris H. Bailey
family photo collection.
Clora Dell Scott is my great-grandmother on my newly found Roberts line. Because “O”s can look like “A”s when written various records, as you will see, sometimes records provide her name as Clora and sometimes Clara.  These name differences are confusing because she has an older sister named Clara. Luckily, Clora’s middle name of Dell is in contrast to her sister’s middle initial of “M.”

Birth

Clora was born on 6 February 1883 in Goode, Franklin County, Illinois.[1] Like many women, she doesn’t age quite as quickly as the calendar.
In 1908, on her marriage license to Hosea Adams, she indicated a birth date of 6 Feb 1884.[2]
In 1920 Census, she states her age as 35, also inferring the birth year of 1884.[3]
In 1936, on her Social Security Application, she indicated a birth date of 6 Feb 1889.[4] (In the 53 years to 1936 she only aged 47 years.)
She was the second child of Samuel Vaden Scott and Amanda Jane Haley. Her older sister, Clara, was born in 1879. We know that she had another sister, Laura born in 1888. She also had another sibling born, probably about 1885 or 1886 who died as an infant. Her sibling’s death was the first of many tragedies in her life.   

Mother’s Death

Clora was only six-years-old when her mother died in 1889. Her father married Lavina A. Shockley three years later. Samuel and Lavina had six children; Alma, Elmer, Amanda, Lillie Flossie and William giving Clora six half-siblings. Her father lived to a ripe old age of 71. 

First Marriage – Roberts

Clora and Hugh Ellis Roberts
with Carrie and Harry c. 1901.
Photo from the Chris H. Bailey
family photo collection. 
Clora married Hugh Ellis Roberts on 7 October 1900.  She was only 17 years old, and Hugh may have only been 16 years old when they married, but both indicated they were 18 on their marriage license. The families probably didn’t mind that that Clora and Hugh got married because seven months later, their first children, fraternal twins, were born.  Harry Ray Roberts and Carrie May Roberts were born on 22 May 1901 in Franklin County, Illinois.
Bert Allen Roberts, my grandfather, was born on 7 September 1903 in Spring Garden, Illinois.
Finally, Mable Ilean Roberts, Clora’s youngest child was born on 2 June 1908.

Tragedy Strikes Again and Then Again.

1908 was a terrible year for Clora.  On June 8th, her daughter Carrie died of diphtheria and measles. In 1908, both diseases were very communicable and very deadly.  It must have been horrific to try to care for a sick child and be pregnant at the same time. I’m sure the stress of trying to keep newborn Mable away from sick Carrie was difficult. Carrie was buried in Hammond Cemetery in Sesser, Franklin County, Illinois.[5] Two months later, Clora’s husband Hugh died of consumption (a term typically used to describe tuberculosis).  Hugh died on 30 August 1908 and is also buried in Hammond Cemetery in Sesser, IL.[6]

Second Marriage – Adams

Adams-Roberts Family c. 1916 - Copy from Kenneth G. Smith collection. Used by permission.
Adams-Roberts Family c.1916
Bert, Mable, & Harry Roberts
Hosea Adams (sitting)
Clora Dell Scott Roberts Adams
on right.
Photo Courtesy: Kenneth Smith
At this point in her life, she appears to have lived in Illinois all of her life.  However, something, or someone, convinced her to move to Indiana. It will take more research to figure out why she moved 150 miles away to Graysville, Indiana, where she married Hosea Lee Adams on 1 December 1908[7] only three months after the death of Bert. Hosea was born in 1889 and was six years younger than Clora. He was 19, and she was 25 at the time of the marriage. The couple lived in Sullivan County, Indiana, through 1910[8] and 1920[9] Census records.
Clora’s sons Bert Allen Roberts and Harry Ray Roberts both married in 1922 and Clora was still in Sullivan County. In 1925, Clora’s daughter Mabel Ilean Roberts married, and Clora is listed as living in Terre Haute.[10]

Later Years

With all of the kids grown and married, it appears that it was time to leave Hosea.  Sometime between 1925 and 1930, Clora and Hosea divorced and Clora moved to the Detroit, Michigan, area.  Again, I don’t know what brought her to Detroit. I have not managed to find Clora in the 1930 or the 1940 Census records. Finding her in those census records may provide insight into her life during those years.  With so many siblings it would be easy for her to hide from Hosea if she wanted to. It is also interesting to note that Clora’s name was listed as Clara in November 1942 in contrast to her name in her initial Social Security application in 1936.[11]

Death & Burial

Clora Dell (Scott) Roberts Adams died on 29 June 1945 in Detroit, Michigan at the age of 62. Her death record indicates her name as Clara.[12] Clora is buried at White Chapel Memorial Cemetery in Troy, Michigan.[13]  I am currently working to find her grave location, so I may visit her resting place in May. 

Further Actions:

·      Find Clora’s marker at the White Chapel Memorial Cemetery and visit.
·      Further analyze Clora’s siblings and determine if any of them were
o   In Sullivan County, Indiana, in 1908 that she may have gone to live with.
o   In Wayne County, Michigan, in 1930 that she may have gone to live with.

List of Greats

1.    Clora Dell Scott
2.     Samuel Vaden Scott
3.     William H. Scott

ENDNOTES

[1] Illinois Births and Christenings, 1824-1940; Clara Dell Scott, 06 Feb 1883; Birth, citing Goode, Franklin, Illinois; FHL microfilm 1,005,290; Family Search.
[2] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Hosey L Adams to Clara D. Roberts – License; Family Search.
[3] 1920 Census; Hosey L Adams – Head; Ancestry.Com.
[4] U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Clora Dellescott Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[5] Chris H. Baley; The Samuel Vaden Scott Family – Clora Dell Scott.
[6] Ibid.
[7] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Hosey Lee Adams – Clara [Clora] Dell Roberts – Marriage Registration; Family Search; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XXFL-SMC.
[8] 1910 Census; Indiana, Sullivan, Turman, District 0178, Hosea Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[9] 1920 Census; Hosey L Adams – Head; Ancestry.Com.
[10] Indiana Marriages, 1811-2007; Olan Hart & Mable Ilean Roberts – 3 Jan 1925; Family Search.
[11] U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007; Clora Dellescott Adams; Ancestry.Com.
[12] Michigan Death Records, 1921-1947; Clara D. Adams – (aka Clora) 005362086_01019; Seeking Michigan.
[13] Find-a-Grave; Clara D. Adams –  Memorial# 141455260; http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=141455260.
———- DISCLAIMER ———-