Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

Veterans Day – 11/11/2013 – The Browns & Others

The Civil War had a dreadful impact upon the Brown and Mannin families.  Enoch Mannin, a Kentucky native, fought for the North as did his son John William Manning,  Other of Enoch’s sons fought for the South making the Civil War one truly of brother fighting brother. 

Enoch Mannin (1823-1971) – Civil War (Union) – Third-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
Enoch enrolled as a Private in Company E, 40th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at Grayson, Kentucky, on 29 August 1863 for one year.  He had black eyes, black hair, a dark complexion and 5′ 6″ tall. 
His military record indicates that he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1864. Not sure yet when he was released, but he was discharged when his regiment mustered out of service on 29 December, 1864 at Leattettsburg, KY. 
The 40th Regiment had the following actions:

Scout duty in north central Kentucky until December 1863. 
Actions at Mt. Sterling December 3 and 10, 1863. 
Scouting in eastern Kentucky until May 1864. 
Near Paintsville, Ky., April 14, 1864. 
Operations against Morgan May 31-June 20. 
Mt. Sterling June 9. Cynthiana June 12. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until September. 
Near New Haven August 2 (Company C). 
Canton and Roaring Springs August 22. 
Burbridge’s Expedition into southwest Virginia September 10-October 17.
Action at Saltville, Va., October 2. 
Duty in eastern Kentucky until December 1864.

Enoch Mannin died on 7 April, 1907. He is buried in Bridgeman Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  
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John William Mannin (aka John William Manning) (1846-1888) – Civil War (Union) – 3rd-Great Grandfather.

US Flag (35 Stars) during Civil War.
John William Mannin (later Manning) enlisted 29 Aug 1863 at Olive Hill, Carter, Kentucky, USA into the 45th Regiment, Kentucky Mounted Infantry at the age of 17. His father, Enoch Mannin, gave his consent to enlist. John William was taller than his father, 5’ 9” tall.  He had blue Eyes, light hair, and a fair complexion. In September mustered into the 40th Infantry Regiment, Kentucky like his father was also in Company E. Like his father, he was captured by Morgan in May/June 1863.  He mustered out on 30 December, 1864 at Catlettsburg, Boyd County, Kentucky.
John William Manning died 25 April, 1888. We do not know where he was buried.

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Henry Brown (aka William Henry Brown)  (1845-unk) – Civil War (Union) – 2nd-Great Grandfather.
Michigan State Flag
Henry Brown Enlisted as a private into the Union.  It is likely that he is the William Henry Brown that enlisted into 4th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry.  
Of a total force of 2,217 men, 3 officers and 48 enlisted men were killed or mortally wounded in battle, and 2 officers and 341 enlisted men perished from disease for a total loss of almost 1 in 5 (18%) dying during the war.
The 4th Michigan Cavalry was involved in the capture of Macon, Georgia, on April 20, 1865, Subsequently, a detachment of the regiment participated in the pursuit and capture of Jefferson Davis at Irwinville, Georgia, on May 10. 
The 4th was assigned to routine duty at Macon and then at Nashville, Tennessee, until the end of June. The regiment mustered out on July 1, 1865.
William Henry Brown’s death and burial location are unknown, however, he is believed to be buried in North Dakota.
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Richard Earl Brown (aka Clifford Brown) (aka Richard Earl Durand) (1903-1990) – No War (Army) – Grandfather.
Shoulder insignia for
the 193rd Infantry
Brigade the largest
force in Panama in the
Little is known about Richard Earl’s military service.  We are unsure which name he used in the military and when he actually went in.  We are fairly certain that he served more than six months but did not serve during any declared war.  We know from oral history that he served in the Army and was in Panama when Donna was in Panama sometime before 1932. 
Searches for his military records have not been successful.  
“Dick” is buried at Gull River Cemetery, Cass County, Minnesota. 
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave virtual marker.  

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The Steps

Although not related directly to me, my “steps” are of interest to my half siblings and my mother’s half brother’s family.
They include two veterans  for whom I have some information.

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Samson Clark Amsterdam (1898-1979) – World War I and World War II – Step Grandfather.

Sammy is the only individual I have found so far that served in two wars.  
On 21 November, 1917, he enlisted in the Army in Brooklyn, New York.  We know he served at 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Harford, Maryland and was discharged from there on 23 May, 1919.
On 17 October, 1942, he enlisted in the Army at Lubbock, Texas. He is described as having brown eyes, black hair, a ruddy complexion, and 5 feet two inches tall. 
In August of 1943 he was promoted to sergeant and discharged on 4 November 1944 with the Army speciality of “Entertainment Director.”
Sammy died 16 April, 1979, and is buried at Riverside Cemetery, Macon, Bibb County, 
Please consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.  Also, request a photo of his Marker.

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Edgar Jerome Matson (aka “Bud”) (1925-2003) – World War II – Step-Father

World War II
Recruiting Poster
“Budger” enlisted in the Army on 23 March, 1944. His Serial Number was 37590415. He was reenlisted on 1 Nov 1946 while a Private First Class. He was promoted to SGT US Army prior to his honorable discharge on 2 February 1949.
He died 12 November, 2003 and is buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.

Please visit his memorial on Find a Grave and consider leaving virtual flowers and a note on his Find-a-Grave Memorial.