January 14, 1925 – M’Allister was Seen Alive Late as Monday Morning

The Savannah Press – January 14, 1925


The county police who are investigating all circumstances in regard to the murder of Edward L. McAllister at his home on Thirty-ninth street, near Ash, will present their findings at the coroner’s inquest tomorrow morning. This is the time tentatively fixed for the inquiry.

The county police also have direct evidence of the fact that Mr. McAllister was alive as late as early Monday morning. R. L. Coleman who gave his address as 222 Taylor street east, went to the county police headquarters at 10 o’clock this morning and gave out the information that he, a friend, C.F. Smith, and a negro saw Mr. McAllister about 7:30 o’clock Monday morning. He had on his raincoat, a chaki work suit, his gloves and was walking west on Thirty-ninth street, going toward the A.C.L. shuttle train, Coleman said. Mr. McAllister stopped long enough to ask Coleman for a cigarette.

Not Mistaken.

Coleman said he could not be mistaken as to the identity of the murdered man, as he worked with him for two years at the Atlantic Coast Line. He did not see the account of the murder until this morning, when he read it in The Press, he said and decided to tell the officers about it. He first went over and related his stor to Chief of Detectives McCarthy, but finding the county police were handling the case, went to their headquarters. The scene of the crime is about sixty feet beyond the eastern city limits.

Coleman said he lived in the basement at 222 Taylor street east. His friend Smith lives on State street west. On Monday he was working on a bungalow being erected by Charles Voss on Thirty-ninth street, just east of Waters road.

Closer inspection of the body of the dead man at Sipple Brothers’ mortuary disclosed that the murder was probably perpetrated in a cool and deliberate manner by the assailant of the lone man who was seated at his dining table when he was struck with the hatchet, according to the theory of the officers.

Wound in Temple.
A wound on the temple is believed to show that Mr. McAllister was first struck on the side of the head and knocked to the floor. He was then set upon, chopped on the head with the sharp blade and the top of his head then beaten to a pulp with the blunt end.

An examination of the dead man’s stomach is said to have disclosed evidence of decomposition believed to prove that Mr. McAllister had been dead at least forty-eight hours before he was found yesterday Morning.

Drew His Pay.
Other interesting details developed by the offices are that Mr. McAllister worked on last Saturday morning and early in the afternoon drew his wages for two ‘weeks, amounting to $84.75. He is said to have paid out only a small amount for groceries at a local store. When found Mr. McAllister only had 75 cents on his person.

Letter From Mother.
Among the effects of the dead man were found a letter from his mother, who lives in Pittsburgh, Pa., in regard to property there in which Mr. McAllister owned an interest. They also found a will in which proceeds of several insurance policies, amounting to several thousand dollars, and all the other property of the dead man was left to his wife. Mrs. McAllister died several months ago but the beneficiary under the policies had not been changed, it was stated.

Facts believed to be inconsistent with the theory that Mr. McAllister was murdered not later than last Sunday are that his watch taken possession of yesterday at 2 o’clock was still running. Two local jewelers have stated that the large “railroad” watches, the kind that the dead man owned, only run about 30 hours.

Although interesting, we didn’t learn much new about Edward’s life. We learned his mother was probably still alive. We also learned that his will not being changed to reflect his wife’s passing means that it probably went to probate. We also learned that there was several thousands of dollars of insurance policies, however, we know he was born in a pauper’s grave which is a reminder that your burial takes place long before your beneficiaries receive any insurance payments.

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